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FET proteins in frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis


Mackenzie, Ian R A; Neumann, Manuela (2012). FET proteins in frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Brain Research, 1462:40-43.

Abstract

Mutations in the fused in sarcoma gene (FUS) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with TDP-43-negative, FUS-positive pathology. FUS is also the pathological protein in most tau/TDP-43-negative subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-FUS). FUS, together with Ewing's sarcoma protein (EWS) and TATA-binding protein associated factor 15 (TAF15), make up the FET family of DNA/RNA binding proteins that share functional homology and have the potential to interact. We recently investigated the role of the other FET proteins in the clinicopathological spectrum of FUS-opathies. In all FTLD-FUS subtypes, FUS-positive pathology was also labeled for TAF15 and EWS and cells with inclusions showed a reduction in the normal nuclear staining of all FET proteins. In contrast, in cases of ALS-FUS, TAF15 and EWS remained localized to the nucleus and did not label FUS-positive inclusions. Cell culture models replicated the human diseases. These findings indicate that ALS-FUS and FTLD-FUS have different pathomechanisms and add TAF15 and EWS to the growing list of RNA-binding proteins involved in neurodegeneration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA-Binding Proteins.

Abstract

Mutations in the fused in sarcoma gene (FUS) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with TDP-43-negative, FUS-positive pathology. FUS is also the pathological protein in most tau/TDP-43-negative subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-FUS). FUS, together with Ewing's sarcoma protein (EWS) and TATA-binding protein associated factor 15 (TAF15), make up the FET family of DNA/RNA binding proteins that share functional homology and have the potential to interact. We recently investigated the role of the other FET proteins in the clinicopathological spectrum of FUS-opathies. In all FTLD-FUS subtypes, FUS-positive pathology was also labeled for TAF15 and EWS and cells with inclusions showed a reduction in the normal nuclear staining of all FET proteins. In contrast, in cases of ALS-FUS, TAF15 and EWS remained localized to the nucleus and did not label FUS-positive inclusions. Cell culture models replicated the human diseases. These findings indicate that ALS-FUS and FTLD-FUS have different pathomechanisms and add TAF15 and EWS to the growing list of RNA-binding proteins involved in neurodegeneration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA-Binding Proteins.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:21 Dec 2012 13:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:11
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0006-8993
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.12.010
PubMed ID:22261247

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