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Evaluation of the atmospheric correction procedure for the APEX level 2/3 processor


Schläpfer, D; Biesemans, J; Hueni, A; Meuleman, K (2008). Evaluation of the atmospheric correction procedure for the APEX level 2/3 processor. Proceedings of SPIE, 7107(710709):12.

Abstract

The Airborne Prism Experiment (APEX) is a hyperspectral instrument built in a Swiss - Belgian collaboration within the ESA-PRODEX program [1]. It aims at highest possible accuracy of its delivered surface reflectance image data products.
The atmospheric correction of hyperspectral imagery is a critical element of a complete processing chain towards
unbiased reflectance and for the creation of higher level products. As the first data of APEX is expected to become
available in 2009, an appropriate processing chain for higher level processing needs to be defined and evaluated.
Standard products have been identified in all application fields of hyperspectral imaging, i.e., geology, vegetation,
cryosphere, limnology and atmosphere. They are being implemented at the APEX science center [2]. The according
processing procedures rely on data of well-defined processing states which range from calibrated at-sensor radiance to(bihemispherical) spectral albedo.
In this paper, the atmospheric processing which is implemented as part of the automated data processing chain for level 2 in the APEX processing and archiving facility (PAF) [3] is evaluated together with the ATCOR-4 atmospheric correction program [4],[5]. The evaluation is done regarding flexibility, reflectance output accuracy and processing efficiency. Two test data sets are taken for this purpose: a well-documented set of HYMAP data [6] and a high resolution HYSPEX data set [7]. Both data sets exhibit areas of overlap, which are taken for self-contained analysis of the atmospheric correction procedure. The accuracy tests include plausibility checks on selected regions of interest including a variety of known surfaces in the imagery. As some of the observed effects are related to BRDF differences, the results also give an indication for the inaccuracy related to these reflectance anisotropies. Speed measurements of the processing are then
compared to the demand for operational processing of series of data acquisition. Further comparison information is
drawn from the by-products of atmospheric correction such as water vapor distribution maps.
The study shows performance and limitations of atmospheric correction using the state-of-the-art technology, which are
mainly found in the field of BRDF effects. This points towards improvements to be implemented in course of the further development of the higher level processing chain for the APEX sensor.

Abstract

The Airborne Prism Experiment (APEX) is a hyperspectral instrument built in a Swiss - Belgian collaboration within the ESA-PRODEX program [1]. It aims at highest possible accuracy of its delivered surface reflectance image data products.
The atmospheric correction of hyperspectral imagery is a critical element of a complete processing chain towards
unbiased reflectance and for the creation of higher level products. As the first data of APEX is expected to become
available in 2009, an appropriate processing chain for higher level processing needs to be defined and evaluated.
Standard products have been identified in all application fields of hyperspectral imaging, i.e., geology, vegetation,
cryosphere, limnology and atmosphere. They are being implemented at the APEX science center [2]. The according
processing procedures rely on data of well-defined processing states which range from calibrated at-sensor radiance to(bihemispherical) spectral albedo.
In this paper, the atmospheric processing which is implemented as part of the automated data processing chain for level 2 in the APEX processing and archiving facility (PAF) [3] is evaluated together with the ATCOR-4 atmospheric correction program [4],[5]. The evaluation is done regarding flexibility, reflectance output accuracy and processing efficiency. Two test data sets are taken for this purpose: a well-documented set of HYMAP data [6] and a high resolution HYSPEX data set [7]. Both data sets exhibit areas of overlap, which are taken for self-contained analysis of the atmospheric correction procedure. The accuracy tests include plausibility checks on selected regions of interest including a variety of known surfaces in the imagery. As some of the observed effects are related to BRDF differences, the results also give an indication for the inaccuracy related to these reflectance anisotropies. Speed measurements of the processing are then
compared to the demand for operational processing of series of data acquisition. Further comparison information is
drawn from the by-products of atmospheric correction such as water vapor distribution maps.
The study shows performance and limitations of atmospheric correction using the state-of-the-art technology, which are
mainly found in the field of BRDF effects. This points towards improvements to be implemented in course of the further development of the higher level processing chain for the APEX sensor.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:12 September 2008
Deposited On:30 Jan 2009 08:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:38
Publisher:SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering
ISSN:0277-786X
Additional Information:Conference Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere XIII, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom on Monday 15 September 2008 Copyright 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. This paper was published in Proceedings of SPIE and is made available as an electronic reprint with permission of SPIE. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1117/12.799884

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