Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Infants’ preferences for object-directed actions of older children compared to object-directed actions of peers and adults


Zmyj, Norbert; Daum, Moritz M; Prinz, Wolfgang; Aschersleben, Gisa (2012). Infants’ preferences for object-directed actions of older children compared to object-directed actions of peers and adults. Infant Behavior and Development, 35:533-542.

Abstract

Previous research reports mixed results concerning infants’ differential interest for a specific age group. Most of these findings are based on studies using static photographs and drawings as stimuli. Moreover, only behavioral data were used to investigate infants’ attentional preferences. In the present study, we showed video sequences of differently aged models (peers, 3.5-year-olds, and adults) manipulating an object, and measured heart rate as an objective psychophysiological measurement of infants’ attention, in addition to looking time and banging rate. The results showed that 12-month-olds preferred watching older children's object-related actions compared to those of peers and adults, but 6- and 9-month-olds did not. In subsequent control experiments, alternative explanations that this preference relied merely on the visual appearance or a higher activity level of older children were excluded. We explain this observed developmental shift by the increasing importance of social learning and object use at this age. Thus, 12-month-olds prefer watching more knowledgeable individuals who provide an action repertoire that infants of this age are about to develop.

Abstract

Previous research reports mixed results concerning infants’ differential interest for a specific age group. Most of these findings are based on studies using static photographs and drawings as stimuli. Moreover, only behavioral data were used to investigate infants’ attentional preferences. In the present study, we showed video sequences of differently aged models (peers, 3.5-year-olds, and adults) manipulating an object, and measured heart rate as an objective psychophysiological measurement of infants’ attention, in addition to looking time and banging rate. The results showed that 12-month-olds preferred watching older children's object-related actions compared to those of peers and adults, but 6- and 9-month-olds did not. In subsequent control experiments, alternative explanations that this preference relied merely on the visual appearance or a higher activity level of older children were excluded. We explain this observed developmental shift by the increasing importance of social learning and object use at this age. Thus, 12-month-olds prefer watching more knowledgeable individuals who provide an action repertoire that infants of this age are about to develop.

Statistics

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2012
Deposited On:17 Dec 2012 10:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:12
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0163-6383
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2012.03.003

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations