Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Affective priming during the processing of news articles


Baumgartner, S E; Wirth, W (2012). Affective priming during the processing of news articles. Media Psychology, 15(1):1-18.

Abstract

The present study investigates the role of affective priming during the processing of news articles. It is assumed that the valence of the affective response to a news article will influence the processing of subsequent news articles. More specifically, it is hypothesized that participants who read a positive article will recall subsequent positive information better than negative information. Similarly, participants who read a negative article will recall subsequent negative information better. To test this assumption, an experimental study was conducted (N = 87). Findings show that participants who read an initial positive article recalled more positive than negative information from six subsequent news articles. Participants who read an initial negative article recalled more negative information than positive information from subsequent news messages. Findings suggest that affective states induced by a news article influence how subsequent articles are processed and which information is learned.

Abstract

The present study investigates the role of affective priming during the processing of news articles. It is assumed that the valence of the affective response to a news article will influence the processing of subsequent news articles. More specifically, it is hypothesized that participants who read a positive article will recall subsequent positive information better than negative information. Similarly, participants who read a negative article will recall subsequent negative information better. To test this assumption, an experimental study was conducted (N = 87). Findings show that participants who read an initial positive article recalled more positive than negative information from six subsequent news articles. Participants who read an initial negative article recalled more negative information than positive information from subsequent news messages. Findings suggest that affective states induced by a news article influence how subsequent articles are processed and which information is learned.

Statistics

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:700 Arts
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:09 Jan 2013 12:45
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 17:33
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1521-3269
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/15213269.2011.648535

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher