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Towards more effective robotic gait training for stroke rehabilitation: a review - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Pennycott, Andrew; Wyss, Dario; Vallery, Heike; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Riener, Robert (2012). Towards more effective robotic gait training for stroke rehabilitation: a review. Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation (JNER), 9:65.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Stroke is the most common cause of disability in the developed world and can severely degrade walking function. Robot-driven gait therapy can provide assistance to patients during training and offers a number of advantages over other forms of therapy. These potential benefits do not, however, seem to have been fully realised as of yet in clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: This review determines ways in which robot-driven gait technology could be improved in order to achieve better outcomes in gait rehabilitation. METHODS: The literature on gait impairments caused by stroke is reviewed, followed by research detailing the different pathways to recovery. The outcomes of clinical trials investigating robot-driven gait therapy are then examined. Finally, an analysis of the literature focused on the technical features of the robot-based devices is presented. This review thus combines both clinical and technical aspects in order to determine the routes by which robot-driven gait therapy could be further developed. CONCLUSIONS: Active subject participation in robot-driven gait therapy is vital to many of the potential recovery pathways and is therefore an important feature of gait training. Higher levels of subject participation and challenge could be promoted through designs with a high emphasis on robotic transparency and sufficient degrees of freedom to allow other aspects of gait such as balance to be incorporated.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Stroke is the most common cause of disability in the developed world and can severely degrade walking function. Robot-driven gait therapy can provide assistance to patients during training and offers a number of advantages over other forms of therapy. These potential benefits do not, however, seem to have been fully realised as of yet in clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: This review determines ways in which robot-driven gait technology could be improved in order to achieve better outcomes in gait rehabilitation. METHODS: The literature on gait impairments caused by stroke is reviewed, followed by research detailing the different pathways to recovery. The outcomes of clinical trials investigating robot-driven gait therapy are then examined. Finally, an analysis of the literature focused on the technical features of the robot-based devices is presented. This review thus combines both clinical and technical aspects in order to determine the routes by which robot-driven gait therapy could be further developed. CONCLUSIONS: Active subject participation in robot-driven gait therapy is vital to many of the potential recovery pathways and is therefore an important feature of gait training. Higher levels of subject participation and challenge could be promoted through designs with a high emphasis on robotic transparency and sufficient degrees of freedom to allow other aspects of gait such as balance to be incorporated.

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49 citations in Web of Science®
57 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:7 September 2012
Deposited On:19 Dec 2012 17:08
Last Modified:03 Aug 2017 15:48
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1743-0003
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/1743-0003-9-65
PubMed ID:22953989

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Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

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