Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Wrist actigraphy predicts outcome in patients with pulmonary hypertension


Ulrich, Silvia; Fischler, Manuel; Speich, Rudolf; Bloch, Konrad E (2013). Wrist actigraphy predicts outcome in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Respiration: International Review of Thoracic Diseases, 86(1):45-51.

Abstract

Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) impairs quality of life, exercise performance and survival. Simple measures to monitor the disease are needed. Objectives: We tested whether actigraphy by a wrist-worn device in the patient's home reflects disease severity in PH patients. Methods: Twenty-three outpatients with pulmonary arterial and chronic thromboembolic PH (15 females), functional classes II-IV, underwent clinical examination and actigraphy over 2 weeks while pursuing their usual life at home. Actigraphies were correlated with clinical data and mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP). Deaths, lung transplantations and pulmonary endarterectomy were recorded over 4 years. Results: Actigraphies revealed a mean ± SD daytime activity duration of 14:57 ± 1:14 h with 146 ± 125 activity counts/min. Very severely impaired patients (mPAP 50 ± 7 mm Hg) were inactive for longer periods at night (8:25 ± 1:18 h) and less active during the day (54 ± 44 counts/min) when compared to modestly impaired patients (mPAP 33 ± 7 mm Hg; inactive at night for 6:58 ± 0:39 h; daytime activity 229 ± 148 counts/min, p < 0.05 in all instances). Out of 19 patients followed for 4 years, 5 died and 1 received a lung transplantation. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a shorter survival without lung transplantation in patients with a duration of daytime activity of <15 h/day than those with >15 h/day duration (log rank, p = 0.026). Conclusion: A long nocturnal rest and reduced daytime activity recorded by actigraphy are associated with severe hemodynamic impairment and reduced survival in patients with PH. Therefore, wrist actigraphy performed during everyday life in the patient's home holds promise as a simple tool for the assessment of disease severity and prognosis in patients with PH.

Abstract

Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) impairs quality of life, exercise performance and survival. Simple measures to monitor the disease are needed. Objectives: We tested whether actigraphy by a wrist-worn device in the patient's home reflects disease severity in PH patients. Methods: Twenty-three outpatients with pulmonary arterial and chronic thromboembolic PH (15 females), functional classes II-IV, underwent clinical examination and actigraphy over 2 weeks while pursuing their usual life at home. Actigraphies were correlated with clinical data and mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP). Deaths, lung transplantations and pulmonary endarterectomy were recorded over 4 years. Results: Actigraphies revealed a mean ± SD daytime activity duration of 14:57 ± 1:14 h with 146 ± 125 activity counts/min. Very severely impaired patients (mPAP 50 ± 7 mm Hg) were inactive for longer periods at night (8:25 ± 1:18 h) and less active during the day (54 ± 44 counts/min) when compared to modestly impaired patients (mPAP 33 ± 7 mm Hg; inactive at night for 6:58 ± 0:39 h; daytime activity 229 ± 148 counts/min, p < 0.05 in all instances). Out of 19 patients followed for 4 years, 5 died and 1 received a lung transplantation. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a shorter survival without lung transplantation in patients with a duration of daytime activity of <15 h/day than those with >15 h/day duration (log rank, p = 0.026). Conclusion: A long nocturnal rest and reduced daytime activity recorded by actigraphy are associated with severe hemodynamic impairment and reduced survival in patients with PH. Therefore, wrist actigraphy performed during everyday life in the patient's home holds promise as a simple tool for the assessment of disease severity and prognosis in patients with PH.

Statistics

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

197 downloads since deposited on 21 Dec 2012
19 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:21 Dec 2012 15:34
Last Modified:09 Jun 2016 14:08
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0025-7931
Additional Information:© 2012 S. Karger AG
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000342351
PubMed ID:23234873

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 378kB
View at publisher
Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 743kB

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations