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Natalizumab treatment perturbs memory- and marginal zone-like B-cell homing in secondary lymphoid organs in multiple sclerosis


Planas, R; Jelčić, I; Schippling, S; Martin, R; Sospedra, M (2012). Natalizumab treatment perturbs memory- and marginal zone-like B-cell homing in secondary lymphoid organs in multiple sclerosis. European Journal of Immunology, 42(3):790-798.

Abstract

Natalizumab, an antibody against the α4 subunit of α4 integrins, has been approved for multiple sclerosis (MS) therapy based on its high efficacy and safety profile. However, natalizumab has been associated with the development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a disorder caused by JC virus (JCV) infection. In order to improve our understanding of the mechanism of action of natalizumab and to identify possible risk factors for PML development, we have characterized in detail the cell blood composition in MS patients treated with natalizumab for more than 30 months. Natalizumab induced the release of lymphoid- but not myeloid precursor cells, which resulted in a chronic increase ofT-, NK- and particularly B cells. While the percentage of recent thymic emigrants (RTEs), naϊve, effector or memory T cells remained unchanged during treatment, a higher percentage of memory- and marginal zone (MZ)-like, but not of naϊve B cells, was observed, which most likely is due to a decreased retention of these cells within the splenic MZ. The ability of natalizumab to influence B-cell migration and homeostasis through the splenic MZ, where JCV has been detected, adds to the list of natalizumab effects and may contribute to PML development by disseminating JCV.

Abstract

Natalizumab, an antibody against the α4 subunit of α4 integrins, has been approved for multiple sclerosis (MS) therapy based on its high efficacy and safety profile. However, natalizumab has been associated with the development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a disorder caused by JC virus (JCV) infection. In order to improve our understanding of the mechanism of action of natalizumab and to identify possible risk factors for PML development, we have characterized in detail the cell blood composition in MS patients treated with natalizumab for more than 30 months. Natalizumab induced the release of lymphoid- but not myeloid precursor cells, which resulted in a chronic increase ofT-, NK- and particularly B cells. While the percentage of recent thymic emigrants (RTEs), naϊve, effector or memory T cells remained unchanged during treatment, a higher percentage of memory- and marginal zone (MZ)-like, but not of naϊve B cells, was observed, which most likely is due to a decreased retention of these cells within the splenic MZ. The ability of natalizumab to influence B-cell migration and homeostasis through the splenic MZ, where JCV has been detected, adds to the list of natalizumab effects and may contribute to PML development by disseminating JCV.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2012
Deposited On:10 Jan 2013 12:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:15
Publisher:Wiley-VCH Verlag Berlin
ISSN:0014-2980
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/eji.201142108
PubMed ID:22144343

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