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Racial variation in umbilical cord blood sex steroid hormones and the insulin-like growth factor axis in African-American and white female neonates


Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Rohrmann, Sabine; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Bienstock, Jessica L; Monsegue, Deborah; Akereyeni, Folasade; Bradwin, Gary; Rifai, Nader; Pollak, Michael N; Platz, Elizabeth A (2012). Racial variation in umbilical cord blood sex steroid hormones and the insulin-like growth factor axis in African-American and white female neonates. Cancer Causes & Control, 23(3):445-454.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate whether there is racial variation in venous umbilical cord blood concentrations of sex steroid hormones and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis between female African-American and white neonates.

METHODS: Maternal and birth characteristics and venous umbilical cord blood samples were collected from 77 African-American and 41 white full-term uncomplicated births at two urban hospitals in 2004 and 2005. Cord blood was measured for testosterone, dehydroespiandrosterone-sulfate, estradiol, and sex steroid hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) by immunoassay. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were measured by ELISA. Crude and multivariable-adjusted geometric mean concentrations were computed for the hormones.

RESULTS: African-American neonates weighed less at birth (3,228 g vs. 3,424 g, p < 0.004) than whites. Birth weight was positively correlated with IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and the molar ratio of IGF-1 to IGFBP-3, but inversely correlated with the molar ratio of IGF-2 to IGFBP-3. Adjusted models showed higher testosterone (1.82 ng/ml vs. 1.47 ng/ml, p = 0.006) and the molar ratio of testosterone to SHBG (0.42 vs. 0.30, p = 0.03) in African-American compared to white female neonates. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFBP-3 were lower in African-American compared to white female neonates, but only the difference for IGF-2 remained significant (496.5 ng/ml vs. 539.2 ng/ml, p = 0.04).

CONCLUSION: We provide evidence of racial variation in cord blood testosterone and testosterone to SHBG in African-American compared to white female neonates, and higher IGF-2 in white compared to African-American female neonates. Findings suggest plausible explanations for a prenatal influence on subsequent breast cancer risk and mortality. Further work is needed to confirm these observations.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate whether there is racial variation in venous umbilical cord blood concentrations of sex steroid hormones and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis between female African-American and white neonates.

METHODS: Maternal and birth characteristics and venous umbilical cord blood samples were collected from 77 African-American and 41 white full-term uncomplicated births at two urban hospitals in 2004 and 2005. Cord blood was measured for testosterone, dehydroespiandrosterone-sulfate, estradiol, and sex steroid hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) by immunoassay. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were measured by ELISA. Crude and multivariable-adjusted geometric mean concentrations were computed for the hormones.

RESULTS: African-American neonates weighed less at birth (3,228 g vs. 3,424 g, p < 0.004) than whites. Birth weight was positively correlated with IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and the molar ratio of IGF-1 to IGFBP-3, but inversely correlated with the molar ratio of IGF-2 to IGFBP-3. Adjusted models showed higher testosterone (1.82 ng/ml vs. 1.47 ng/ml, p = 0.006) and the molar ratio of testosterone to SHBG (0.42 vs. 0.30, p = 0.03) in African-American compared to white female neonates. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFBP-3 were lower in African-American compared to white female neonates, but only the difference for IGF-2 remained significant (496.5 ng/ml vs. 539.2 ng/ml, p = 0.04).

CONCLUSION: We provide evidence of racial variation in cord blood testosterone and testosterone to SHBG in African-American compared to white female neonates, and higher IGF-2 in white compared to African-American female neonates. Findings suggest plausible explanations for a prenatal influence on subsequent breast cancer risk and mortality. Further work is needed to confirm these observations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:17 Jan 2013 08:14
Last Modified:08 Aug 2017 19:33
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0957-5243
Additional Information:The final publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-011-9893-6
PubMed ID:22252677

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