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Permeability of the landscape matrix between amphibian breeding sites


Van Buskirk, J (2012). Permeability of the landscape matrix between amphibian breeding sites. Ecology and Evolution, 2(12):3160-3167.

Abstract

For organisms that reproduce in discrete habitat patches, land cover between patches (known as the matrix) is important for dispersal among breeding sites. Models of patchy populations often incorporate information on the permeability of the matrix to dispersal, sometimes based on expert opinion. I estimated the relative resistance to gene flow of land cover types and barriers using FST calculated from microsatellite markers in two amphibians, within an 800 km2 area in northern Switzerland. The species included a frog (Rana temporaria: 996 individuals, 48 populations, 7 markers) and a newt (Triturus alpestris: 816 individuals, 41 populations, 7 markers). Open fields and urban areas were more resistant to gene flow than forested land; roads and highways also reduced permeability. Results were similar for the two species. However, differences in resistance among matrix elements were relatively low: gene flow through urban areas was reduced by only 24-42% relative to forest; a divided highway reduced gene flow by 11-40% and was 7-8 times more resistant than a secondary road. These data offer an empirically-based alternative to expert opinion for setting relative resistance values in landscape models.

Abstract

For organisms that reproduce in discrete habitat patches, land cover between patches (known as the matrix) is important for dispersal among breeding sites. Models of patchy populations often incorporate information on the permeability of the matrix to dispersal, sometimes based on expert opinion. I estimated the relative resistance to gene flow of land cover types and barriers using FST calculated from microsatellite markers in two amphibians, within an 800 km2 area in northern Switzerland. The species included a frog (Rana temporaria: 996 individuals, 48 populations, 7 markers) and a newt (Triturus alpestris: 816 individuals, 41 populations, 7 markers). Open fields and urban areas were more resistant to gene flow than forested land; roads and highways also reduced permeability. Results were similar for the two species. However, differences in resistance among matrix elements were relatively low: gene flow through urban areas was reduced by only 24-42% relative to forest; a divided highway reduced gene flow by 11-40% and was 7-8 times more resistant than a secondary road. These data offer an empirically-based alternative to expert opinion for setting relative resistance values in landscape models.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:21 Jan 2013 13:21
Last Modified:06 Aug 2017 20:50
Publisher:Wiley Open Access
ISSN:2045-7758
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.424
PubMed ID:23301180

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