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Delir und Multimorbidität im Alter


Savaskan, E (2012). Delir und Multimorbidität im Alter. Praxis, 101(25):1633-1636.

Abstract

Delirium is an acute confusion state of multifactorial genesis, commonly seen in the elderly with multimorbidity. Age and dementia, followed by infections and polypharmacy, are known as the most important risk factors. Increased disease interactions and medication use in the multimorbid elderly might precipitate delirium. Serious consequences of multimorbidity often are psychiatric diseases such as depression. Also anxiety and schizoprenia show a high comorbidity with somatic diseases. The therapy of elderly multimorbid patients is risky and must be preceded by profound assessment of all pathogenic factors. Pharmacotherapy needs an ongoing screening for side effects and indication.

Abstract

Delirium is an acute confusion state of multifactorial genesis, commonly seen in the elderly with multimorbidity. Age and dementia, followed by infections and polypharmacy, are known as the most important risk factors. Increased disease interactions and medication use in the multimorbid elderly might precipitate delirium. Serious consequences of multimorbidity often are psychiatric diseases such as depression. Also anxiety and schizoprenia show a high comorbidity with somatic diseases. The therapy of elderly multimorbid patients is risky and must be preceded by profound assessment of all pathogenic factors. Pharmacotherapy needs an ongoing screening for side effects and indication.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Delirium and multimorbidity in the elderly
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2012
Deposited On:22 Jan 2013 12:51
Last Modified:16 Aug 2016 10:12
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:1661-8157
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/1661-8157/a001147
PubMed ID:23233102

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