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Who plays the strings in newborn analgesia at birth, vasopressin or oxytocin?


Wellmann, S; Bührer, C (2012). Who plays the strings in newborn analgesia at birth, vasopressin or oxytocin? Frontiers in Neuroscience, 6:78.

Abstract

For many years, oxytocin has been viewed as the primary hormone edging endocrinology, behavior, and pain in mothers and infants around parturition. Very recent work puts the vasopressin receptor 1A in the focus of peripheral analgesia and pain relief in respect to circulating vasopressin and oxytocin. Here, we present a concise overview on these new findings, will discuss them in context of parturition, and will outline new avenues.

Abstract

For many years, oxytocin has been viewed as the primary hormone edging endocrinology, behavior, and pain in mothers and infants around parturition. Very recent work puts the vasopressin receptor 1A in the focus of peripheral analgesia and pain relief in respect to circulating vasopressin and oxytocin. Here, we present a concise overview on these new findings, will discuss them in context of parturition, and will outline new avenues.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:22 Jan 2013 16:41
Last Modified:21 Aug 2017 14:21
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1662-453X
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2012.00078
PubMed ID:22661926

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