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X-ray mosaic nanotomography of large microorganisms


Mokso, R; Quaroni, L; Marone, F; Irvine, S; Vila-Comamala, J; Blanke, A; Stampanoni, M (2012). X-ray mosaic nanotomography of large microorganisms. Journal of Structural Biology, 177(2):233-238.

Abstract

Full-field X-ray microscopy is a valuable tool for 3D observation of biological systems. In the soft X-ray domain organelles can be visualized in individual cells while hard X-ray microscopes excel in imaging of larger complex biological tissue. The field of view of these instruments is typically 103 times the spatial resolution. We exploit the assets of the hard X-ray sub-micrometer imaging and extend the standard approach by widening the effective field of view to match the size of the sample. We show that global tomography of biological systems exceeding several times the field of view is feasible also at the nanoscale with moderate radiation dose. We address the performance issues and limitations of the TOMCAT full-field microscope and more generally for Zernike phase contrast imaging. Two biologically relevant systems were investigated. The first being the largest known bacteria (Thiomargarita namibiensis), the second is a small myriapod species (Pauropoda sp.). Both examples illustrate the capacity of the unique, structured condenser based broad-band full-field microscope to access the 3D structural details of biological systems at the nanoscale while avoiding complicated sample preparation, or even keeping the sample environment close to the natural state.

Abstract

Full-field X-ray microscopy is a valuable tool for 3D observation of biological systems. In the soft X-ray domain organelles can be visualized in individual cells while hard X-ray microscopes excel in imaging of larger complex biological tissue. The field of view of these instruments is typically 103 times the spatial resolution. We exploit the assets of the hard X-ray sub-micrometer imaging and extend the standard approach by widening the effective field of view to match the size of the sample. We show that global tomography of biological systems exceeding several times the field of view is feasible also at the nanoscale with moderate radiation dose. We address the performance issues and limitations of the TOMCAT full-field microscope and more generally for Zernike phase contrast imaging. Two biologically relevant systems were investigated. The first being the largest known bacteria (Thiomargarita namibiensis), the second is a small myriapod species (Pauropoda sp.). Both examples illustrate the capacity of the unique, structured condenser based broad-band full-field microscope to access the 3D structural details of biological systems at the nanoscale while avoiding complicated sample preparation, or even keeping the sample environment close to the natural state.

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14 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:23 Jan 2013 12:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:19
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1047-8477
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsb.2011.12.014

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