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Where do all the maternal effects go? Variation in offspring body size through ontogeny in the live-bearing fish Poecilia parae


Lindholm, A K; Hunt, J; Brooks, R (2006). Where do all the maternal effects go? Variation in offspring body size through ontogeny in the live-bearing fish Poecilia parae. Biology Letters, 2(4):586-589.

Abstract

Maternal effects are an important source of adaptive variation, but little is known about how they vary throughout ontogeny. We estimate the contribution of maternal effects, sire genetic and environmental variation to offspring body size from birth until 1 year of age in the live-bearing fish Poecilia parae. In both the sexes, maternal effects on body size were initially high in juveniles, and then declined to zero at sexual maturity. In sons, this was accompanied by a sharp rise in sire genetic variance, consistent with the expression of Y-linked loci affecting male size. In daughters, all variance components decreased with time, consistent with compensatory growth. There were significant negative among-dam correlations between early body size and the timing of sexual maturity in both sons and daughters. However, there was no relationship between early life maternal effects and adult longevity, suggesting that maternal effects, although important early in life, may not always influence late life-history traits.

Abstract

Maternal effects are an important source of adaptive variation, but little is known about how they vary throughout ontogeny. We estimate the contribution of maternal effects, sire genetic and environmental variation to offspring body size from birth until 1 year of age in the live-bearing fish Poecilia parae. In both the sexes, maternal effects on body size were initially high in juveniles, and then declined to zero at sexual maturity. In sons, this was accompanied by a sharp rise in sire genetic variance, consistent with the expression of Y-linked loci affecting male size. In daughters, all variance components decreased with time, consistent with compensatory growth. There were significant negative among-dam correlations between early body size and the timing of sexual maturity in both sons and daughters. However, there was no relationship between early life maternal effects and adult longevity, suggesting that maternal effects, although important early in life, may not always influence late life-history traits.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:28 Mar 2013 13:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:19
Publisher:Royal Society Publishing
ISSN:1744-9561
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2006.0546

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