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A randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled study to evaluate an effective ciclosporin dose for the treatment of feline hypersensitivity dermatitis


King, S; Favrot, C; Messinger, L; Nuttall, T; Steffan, J; Forster, S; Seewald, W (2012). A randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled study to evaluate an effective ciclosporin dose for the treatment of feline hypersensitivity dermatitis. Veterinary Dermatology, 23(5):440-e84.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hypersensitivity dermatitides (HD) are frequently suspected in cats, but there are few clinical studies on safe and effective treatments in the published literature.
OBJECTIVES: To establish a safe and effective dose of ciclosporin in the treatment of feline HD.
ANIMALS: One hundred client-owned cats with feline HD.
METHODS: Double-blind study, with cats randomly assigned to receive ciclosporin at either 7.0 mg/kg once daily (n = 33) or 2.5 mg/kg once daily (n = 32) or a placebo (n = 35) for 6 weeks.
RESULTS: Mean Total Lesion Scores with 7.0 mg/kg ciclosporin were significantly lower than with 2.5 mg/kg ciclosporin (P = 0.0047) or placebo (P = 0.0003) at study end. Individual Total Lesion Scores improved by >50% in 70% of the 7.0 mg/kg group, compared with 47% in the 2.5 mg/kg group and 23% in the placebo group (P = 0.0006). The investigators' Global Assessment of Improvement was 'excellent' or 'good' in 61% of cats treated with 7.0 mg/kg ciclosporin, compared with 47% of cats given 2.5 mg/kg and 23% given placebo. The improvement in Investigator Pruritus Scores was significantly greater in cats treated with 7.0 mg/kg ciclosporin (54%) compared with both 2.5 mg/kg ciclosporin (32%; P = 0.0232) and placebo (21%; P = 0.0063). Mild gastrointestinal disorders were the most common adverse events, but these did not require cessation of therapy.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Results suggest that 7.0 mg/kg ciclosporin once daily in food or per os for 6 weeks is effective and well tolerated in feline HD.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hypersensitivity dermatitides (HD) are frequently suspected in cats, but there are few clinical studies on safe and effective treatments in the published literature.
OBJECTIVES: To establish a safe and effective dose of ciclosporin in the treatment of feline HD.
ANIMALS: One hundred client-owned cats with feline HD.
METHODS: Double-blind study, with cats randomly assigned to receive ciclosporin at either 7.0 mg/kg once daily (n = 33) or 2.5 mg/kg once daily (n = 32) or a placebo (n = 35) for 6 weeks.
RESULTS: Mean Total Lesion Scores with 7.0 mg/kg ciclosporin were significantly lower than with 2.5 mg/kg ciclosporin (P = 0.0047) or placebo (P = 0.0003) at study end. Individual Total Lesion Scores improved by >50% in 70% of the 7.0 mg/kg group, compared with 47% in the 2.5 mg/kg group and 23% in the placebo group (P = 0.0006). The investigators' Global Assessment of Improvement was 'excellent' or 'good' in 61% of cats treated with 7.0 mg/kg ciclosporin, compared with 47% of cats given 2.5 mg/kg and 23% given placebo. The improvement in Investigator Pruritus Scores was significantly greater in cats treated with 7.0 mg/kg ciclosporin (54%) compared with both 2.5 mg/kg ciclosporin (32%; P = 0.0232) and placebo (21%; P = 0.0063). Mild gastrointestinal disorders were the most common adverse events, but these did not require cessation of therapy.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Results suggest that 7.0 mg/kg ciclosporin once daily in food or per os for 6 weeks is effective and well tolerated in feline HD.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:28 Jan 2013 12:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0959-4493
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3164.2012.01086.x
PubMed ID:22882582

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