Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is associated with central and nephrogenic defects in osmoregulation


Ho, Thien Anh; Godefroid, Nathalie; Gruzon, Damien; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Maréchal, Céline; Wang, Xueqi; Serra, Andreas; Pirson, Yves; Devuyst, Olivier (2012). Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is associated with central and nephrogenic defects in osmoregulation. Kidney International, 82(10):1121-1129.

Abstract

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is associated with a urine-concentrating defect attributed to renal cystic changes. As PKD genes are expressed in the brain, altered central release of arginine vasopressin could also play a role. In order to help determine this we measured central and nephrogenic components of osmoregulation in 10 adults and 10 children with ADPKD, all with normal renal function, and compared them to 20 age- and gender-matched controls. Overnight water deprivation caused a lower rise in urine osmolality in the patients with ADPKD than controls, reflecting an impaired release of vasopressin and a peripheral defect in the patients. The reactivity of plasma vasopressin to water deprivation, as found in controls, was blunted in the patients with the latter showing lower urine osmolality for the same range of plasma vasopressin. The maximal urine osmolality correlated negatively with total kidney volume. Defective osmoregulation was confirmed in the children with ADPKD but was unrelated to number of renal cysts or kidney size. Thus, patients with ADPKD have an early defect in osmoregulation, with a blunted release of arginine vasopressin. This reflects expression of polycystins in hypothalamic nuclei that synthesize vasopressin, and this should be considered when evaluating treatments targeting the vasopressin pathway in ADPKD.

Abstract

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is associated with a urine-concentrating defect attributed to renal cystic changes. As PKD genes are expressed in the brain, altered central release of arginine vasopressin could also play a role. In order to help determine this we measured central and nephrogenic components of osmoregulation in 10 adults and 10 children with ADPKD, all with normal renal function, and compared them to 20 age- and gender-matched controls. Overnight water deprivation caused a lower rise in urine osmolality in the patients with ADPKD than controls, reflecting an impaired release of vasopressin and a peripheral defect in the patients. The reactivity of plasma vasopressin to water deprivation, as found in controls, was blunted in the patients with the latter showing lower urine osmolality for the same range of plasma vasopressin. The maximal urine osmolality correlated negatively with total kidney volume. Defective osmoregulation was confirmed in the children with ADPKD but was unrelated to number of renal cysts or kidney size. Thus, patients with ADPKD have an early defect in osmoregulation, with a blunted release of arginine vasopressin. This reflects expression of polycystins in hypothalamic nuclei that synthesize vasopressin, and this should be considered when evaluating treatments targeting the vasopressin pathway in ADPKD.

Statistics

Citations

21 citations in Web of Science®
19 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

69 downloads since deposited on 18 Jan 2013
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nephrology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:18 Jan 2013 12:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:19
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0085-2538
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.2012.225
PubMed ID:22718190

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 490kB
View at publisher