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Invasive mosquito species in Europe and Serbia, 1979 – 2011


Petric, D; Zgomba, M; Ignjatovic, C A; Marinkovic, D; Bellini, R; Schaffner, F; Pajovic, I (2012). Invasive mosquito species in Europe and Serbia, 1979 – 2011. In: Internation Symposium: Current Trends in Plant Protection, Institute for Plant Protection and Environment, Beograd, Serbia, 25 September 2012 - 28 September 2012, 496-505.

Abstract

People’s increased mobility and international trade play important roles in the dissemination of vectors and the pathogens that they could transmit. Climate change is likely to become another important consideration in the near future. The responses of insects to these changes (in addition to potential for increased vector capacity) could allow for a broadening of their colonized areas and the invasion of new sites. In the last couple of years a number of pathogen introductions into Europe have been recorded. The latest (Ravenna, Italy, 2007) was caused by the tropical Chikungunya virus, which is transmitted by the “Asian tiger mosquito”, a species introduced into Europe in 1979 (Albania), and then Italy in 1990. Invasion continued to France in 1999 and until present, Belgium, Montenegro, Greece, Switzerland, Croatia, Spain, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Germany, Serbia, Bulgaria and Turkey have been invaded. Deciphering the true cause of changes in the distribution of mosquitoes is difficult and complex and depends, to a great extent, on the availability of data obtained by monitoring. In order to assist in vector-borne disease preparedness, distribution of the most important invasive species St. albopicta in Europe and particulars of findings in Serbia are conferred.

Abstract

People’s increased mobility and international trade play important roles in the dissemination of vectors and the pathogens that they could transmit. Climate change is likely to become another important consideration in the near future. The responses of insects to these changes (in addition to potential for increased vector capacity) could allow for a broadening of their colonized areas and the invasion of new sites. In the last couple of years a number of pathogen introductions into Europe have been recorded. The latest (Ravenna, Italy, 2007) was caused by the tropical Chikungunya virus, which is transmitted by the “Asian tiger mosquito”, a species introduced into Europe in 1979 (Albania), and then Italy in 1990. Invasion continued to France in 1999 and until present, Belgium, Montenegro, Greece, Switzerland, Croatia, Spain, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Germany, Serbia, Bulgaria and Turkey have been invaded. Deciphering the true cause of changes in the distribution of mosquitoes is difficult and complex and depends, to a great extent, on the availability of data obtained by monitoring. In order to assist in vector-borne disease preparedness, distribution of the most important invasive species St. albopicta in Europe and particulars of findings in Serbia are conferred.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Other), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Language:English
Event End Date:28 September 2012
Deposited On:25 Jan 2013 16:09
Last Modified:14 Aug 2017 09:57
Related URLs:http://wbc-inco.net/object/event/9751

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