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Leptin and leptin receptor gene expression in the canine corpus luteum during diestrus, pregnancy and after aglepristone-induced luteolysis


Balogh, O; Kowalewski, M P; Reichler, I M (2012). Leptin and leptin receptor gene expression in the canine corpus luteum during diestrus, pregnancy and after aglepristone-induced luteolysis. Reproduction in Domestic Animals, 47(s6):40-42.

Abstract

Leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEP-R) expression was shown to change throughout the luteal phase in several species and may be involved in steroid hormone production. In the bitch, leptin but not LEP-R protein was detected in the non-pregnant corpus luteum (CL). Until now, no further information has been available on their expression levels and role in CL function. Our objective was to compare time-related changes in luteal LEP and LEP-R mRNA levels during the non-pregnant luteal phase, pregnancy and after aglepristone treatment in mid-gestation. CLs were collected by ovariohysterectomy at different time points: day (d) 5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 65 after ovulation (p.o.) in non-pregnant bitches; pre-implantation, post-implantation, mid-gestation, during prepartum luteolysis; 24 and 72 h after aglepristone injection. Non-pregnant LEP expression was lowest on d5 p.o., increased thereafter and fell again on d45 (P ≤ 0.04). LEP-R expression was not altered (P = 0.07). In pregnant bitches, neither LEP nor LEP-R mRNA levels varied over time (P = 0.201 and P = 0.150, respectively). Aglepristone treatment caused substantial downregulation of luteal LEP expression by 72h post-treatment (P ≤ 0.01). However, LEP-R expression did not follow the same course (P = 0.193). Our results indicate that both LEP and LEP-R mRNA are present in the canine CL during the non-pregnant luteal phase and pregnancy. LEP expression changes significantly over time in non-pregnant dogs and after aglepristone administration and thus, it may play a role in luteal steroidogenesis and regression.

Abstract

Leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEP-R) expression was shown to change throughout the luteal phase in several species and may be involved in steroid hormone production. In the bitch, leptin but not LEP-R protein was detected in the non-pregnant corpus luteum (CL). Until now, no further information has been available on their expression levels and role in CL function. Our objective was to compare time-related changes in luteal LEP and LEP-R mRNA levels during the non-pregnant luteal phase, pregnancy and after aglepristone treatment in mid-gestation. CLs were collected by ovariohysterectomy at different time points: day (d) 5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 65 after ovulation (p.o.) in non-pregnant bitches; pre-implantation, post-implantation, mid-gestation, during prepartum luteolysis; 24 and 72 h after aglepristone injection. Non-pregnant LEP expression was lowest on d5 p.o., increased thereafter and fell again on d45 (P ≤ 0.04). LEP-R expression was not altered (P = 0.07). In pregnant bitches, neither LEP nor LEP-R mRNA levels varied over time (P = 0.201 and P = 0.150, respectively). Aglepristone treatment caused substantial downregulation of luteal LEP expression by 72h post-treatment (P ≤ 0.01). However, LEP-R expression did not follow the same course (P = 0.193). Our results indicate that both LEP and LEP-R mRNA are present in the canine CL during the non-pregnant luteal phase and pregnancy. LEP expression changes significantly over time in non-pregnant dogs and after aglepristone administration and thus, it may play a role in luteal steroidogenesis and regression.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Anatomy
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:28 Jan 2013 09:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:20
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0936-6768
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/rda.12005
PubMed ID:23279462

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