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Evolutionary rates do not drive latitudinal diversity gradients


Escarguel, G; Brayard, A; Bucher, H (2008). Evolutionary rates do not drive latitudinal diversity gradients. Journal of zoological systematics and evolutionary research, 46(1):82-86.

Abstract

Among the several hypotheses invoked for explaining latitudinal diversity gradients (LDGs), some models classified within the 'evolutionary hypothesis' family assume that LDGs are the direct consequence of latitudinal variations in the speciation and/or extinctions rates. Spatially structured simulations of the biogeographical dispersal of a randomly generated clade refute the central tenet of these explanatory models and indicate that global diversity patterns are combined outcomes of geographic and thermal mid-domain effects under a phylogenetically controlled niche conservatism constraint. The positive correlation observed in several higher taxa between speciation rate and diversity does not involve any causal relationship between these two parameters but is most likely the first order by-product of a positive correlation between temperature and per capita speciation rate.

Abstract

Among the several hypotheses invoked for explaining latitudinal diversity gradients (LDGs), some models classified within the 'evolutionary hypothesis' family assume that LDGs are the direct consequence of latitudinal variations in the speciation and/or extinctions rates. Spatially structured simulations of the biogeographical dispersal of a randomly generated clade refute the central tenet of these explanatory models and indicate that global diversity patterns are combined outcomes of geographic and thermal mid-domain effects under a phylogenetically controlled niche conservatism constraint. The positive correlation observed in several higher taxa between speciation rate and diversity does not involve any causal relationship between these two parameters but is most likely the first order by-product of a positive correlation between temperature and per capita speciation rate.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
Dewey Decimal Classification:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Language:English
Date:10 January 2008
Deposited On:15 Dec 2008 14:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:39
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0947-5745
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0469.2007.00443.x
Official URL:http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119408789/abstract

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