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Deltoid, triceps, or both responses improve the success rate of the interscalene catheter surgical block compared with the biceps response


Borgeat, A; Ekatodramis, G; Guzzella, S; Ruland, P; Votta-Velis, G; Aguirre, J (2012). Deltoid, triceps, or both responses improve the success rate of the interscalene catheter surgical block compared with the biceps response. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 109(6):975-980.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The influence of the muscular response elicited by neurostimulation on the success rate of interscalene block using a catheter (ISC) is unknown. In this investigation, we compared the success rate of ISC placement as indicated by biceps or deltoid, triceps, or both twitches.
METHODS: Three hundred (ASA I-II) patients presenting for elective arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were prospectively randomized to assessment by biceps (Group B) or deltoid, triceps, or both twitches (Group DT). All ISCs were placed with the aid of neurostimulation. The tip of the stimulating needle was placed after disappearance of either biceps or deltoid, triceps, or both twitches at 0.3 mA. The catheter was advanced 2-3 cm past the tip of the needle and the block was performed using 40 ml ropivacaine 0.5%. Successful block was defined as sensory block of the supraclavicular nerve and sensory and motor block involving the axillary, radial, median, and musculocutaneous nerves within 30 min.
RESULTS: Success rate was 98.6% in Group DT compared with 92.5% in Group B (95% confidence interval 0.01-0.11; P<0.02). Supplemental analgesics during handling of the posterior part of the shoulder capsule were needed in two patients in Group DT and seven patients in Group B. Three patients in Group B had an incomplete radial nerve distribution anaesthesia necessitating general anaesthesia. One patient in Group B had an incomplete posterior block extension of the supraclavicular nerve. No acute or late complications were observed.
CONCLUSIONS: Eliciting deltoid, triceps, or both twitches was associated with a higher success rate compared with eliciting biceps twitches during continuous interscalene block.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The influence of the muscular response elicited by neurostimulation on the success rate of interscalene block using a catheter (ISC) is unknown. In this investigation, we compared the success rate of ISC placement as indicated by biceps or deltoid, triceps, or both twitches.
METHODS: Three hundred (ASA I-II) patients presenting for elective arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were prospectively randomized to assessment by biceps (Group B) or deltoid, triceps, or both twitches (Group DT). All ISCs were placed with the aid of neurostimulation. The tip of the stimulating needle was placed after disappearance of either biceps or deltoid, triceps, or both twitches at 0.3 mA. The catheter was advanced 2-3 cm past the tip of the needle and the block was performed using 40 ml ropivacaine 0.5%. Successful block was defined as sensory block of the supraclavicular nerve and sensory and motor block involving the axillary, radial, median, and musculocutaneous nerves within 30 min.
RESULTS: Success rate was 98.6% in Group DT compared with 92.5% in Group B (95% confidence interval 0.01-0.11; P<0.02). Supplemental analgesics during handling of the posterior part of the shoulder capsule were needed in two patients in Group DT and seven patients in Group B. Three patients in Group B had an incomplete radial nerve distribution anaesthesia necessitating general anaesthesia. One patient in Group B had an incomplete posterior block extension of the supraclavicular nerve. No acute or late complications were observed.
CONCLUSIONS: Eliciting deltoid, triceps, or both twitches was associated with a higher success rate compared with eliciting biceps twitches during continuous interscalene block.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:18 Jan 2013 09:04
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:20
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0007-0912
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/aes296
PubMed ID:22879677

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