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Regulation of microglia development and homeostasis - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Greter, Melanie; Merad, Miriam (2013). Regulation of microglia development and homeostasis. Glia, 61(1):121-127.

Abstract

Microglia represent the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) and account for 10% of the adult glial cell population in the normal brain. Although microglial cells are thought to contribute to most pathological conditions including CNS infections, neuroinflammatory lesions, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases, their exact role in CNS development, homeostasis, and disease remains poorly understood. In contrast to most macrophage populations, microglia survive high-dose ionizing radiation and maintain themselves locally and independently of circulating precursors in the steady state. However, controversies remain on the origin of microglia in the brain and whether they could potentially be repopulated by circulating myeloid precursors after brain injury. Microglia-targeted therapies through the use of genetically modified circulating hematopoietic cells proved to be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of brain diseases. It is thus of great importance to understand the contribution and developmental cues of circulating myeloid cells as potential microglia progenitors to the adult pool of microglia in the steady state and under inflammatory conditions.

Abstract

Microglia represent the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) and account for 10% of the adult glial cell population in the normal brain. Although microglial cells are thought to contribute to most pathological conditions including CNS infections, neuroinflammatory lesions, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases, their exact role in CNS development, homeostasis, and disease remains poorly understood. In contrast to most macrophage populations, microglia survive high-dose ionizing radiation and maintain themselves locally and independently of circulating precursors in the steady state. However, controversies remain on the origin of microglia in the brain and whether they could potentially be repopulated by circulating myeloid precursors after brain injury. Microglia-targeted therapies through the use of genetically modified circulating hematopoietic cells proved to be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of brain diseases. It is thus of great importance to understand the contribution and developmental cues of circulating myeloid cells as potential microglia progenitors to the adult pool of microglia in the steady state and under inflammatory conditions.

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38 citations in Web of Science®
45 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:22 Mar 2013 11:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:22
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0894-1491
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/glia.22408
PubMed ID:22927325

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