Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the adductor magnus tendon: an anatomic study


Jacobi, M; Reischl, N; Bergmann, M; Bouaicha, S; Djonov, V; Magnussen, R A (2012). Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the adductor magnus tendon: an anatomic study. Arthroscopy, 28(1):105-109.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the anatomic feasibility of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction using a part of the adductor magnus tendon and to identify possible risks.
METHODS: Twenty cadaveric knees were dissected. The distal part of the adductor magnus tendon was evaluated with respect to the anatomic topography and its utility for MPFL reconstruction. To estimate the risk of injuring the neurovascular structures, the distance from the adductor tubercle to the adductor hiatus was evaluated. An MPFL reconstruction was carried out by preserving the distal insertion on the adductor tubercle and redirecting the proximal portion of the tendon to the medial aspect of the patella.
RESULTS: The anatomic investigation showed the following relationships: The mean distance from the adductor tubercle to the adductor hiatus was 99 ± 14 mm (range, 80 to 120 mm). A graft length of 52 ± 5 mm (range, 45 to 63 mm) with the addition of 10 to 20 mm for fixation was found to be necessary for MPFL reconstruction. The difference between the desired graft length and the distance to the adductor hiatus was found to be at least 30 mm in all cases (mean, 46 mm). Leaving the graft attached to the adductor tubercle resulted in a nearly anatomic femoral attachment of the reconstructed MPFL. Complete detachment of the distal adductor magnus attachment was consistently avoidable.
CONCLUSIONS: The adductor magnus tendon was found to be a useful graft for MPFL reconstruction. However, anatomic dangers (damage to the neurovascular bundle of the adductor hiatus, the saphenous nerve, or the saphenous branch of the descending genicular artery) during graft harvest must be considered.
CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Anatomic knowledge is essential during adductor magnus tendon harvest to avoid damage to neurovascular structures. The adductor magnus tendon is an interesting alternative graft option for MPFL reconstruction if anatomic dangers are considered and avoided.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the anatomic feasibility of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction using a part of the adductor magnus tendon and to identify possible risks.
METHODS: Twenty cadaveric knees were dissected. The distal part of the adductor magnus tendon was evaluated with respect to the anatomic topography and its utility for MPFL reconstruction. To estimate the risk of injuring the neurovascular structures, the distance from the adductor tubercle to the adductor hiatus was evaluated. An MPFL reconstruction was carried out by preserving the distal insertion on the adductor tubercle and redirecting the proximal portion of the tendon to the medial aspect of the patella.
RESULTS: The anatomic investigation showed the following relationships: The mean distance from the adductor tubercle to the adductor hiatus was 99 ± 14 mm (range, 80 to 120 mm). A graft length of 52 ± 5 mm (range, 45 to 63 mm) with the addition of 10 to 20 mm for fixation was found to be necessary for MPFL reconstruction. The difference between the desired graft length and the distance to the adductor hiatus was found to be at least 30 mm in all cases (mean, 46 mm). Leaving the graft attached to the adductor tubercle resulted in a nearly anatomic femoral attachment of the reconstructed MPFL. Complete detachment of the distal adductor magnus attachment was consistently avoidable.
CONCLUSIONS: The adductor magnus tendon was found to be a useful graft for MPFL reconstruction. However, anatomic dangers (damage to the neurovascular bundle of the adductor hiatus, the saphenous nerve, or the saphenous branch of the descending genicular artery) during graft harvest must be considered.
CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Anatomic knowledge is essential during adductor magnus tendon harvest to avoid damage to neurovascular structures. The adductor magnus tendon is an interesting alternative graft option for MPFL reconstruction if anatomic dangers are considered and avoided.

Statistics

Citations

12 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2012
Deposited On:04 Feb 2013 12:52
Last Modified:17 Jan 2017 08:06
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0749-8063
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2011.07.015

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations