Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Evolution of viral proteins originated de novo by overprinting


Sabath, Niv; Wagner, Andreas; Karlin, David (2012). Evolution of viral proteins originated de novo by overprinting. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 29(12):3767-3780.

Abstract

New protein-coding genes can originate either through modification of existing genes or de novo. Recently, the importance of de novo origination has been recognized in eukaryotes, although eukaryotic genes originated de novo are relatively rare and difficult to identify. In contrast, viruses contain many de novo genes, namely those in which an existing gene has been "overprinted" by a new open reading frame, a process that generates a new protein-coding gene overlapping the ancestral gene. We analyzed the evolution of 12 experimentally validated viral genes that originated de novo and estimated their relative ages. We found that young de novo genes have a different codon usage from the rest of the genome. They evolve rapidly and are under positive or weak purifying selection. Thus, young de novo genes might have strain-specific functions, or no function, and would be difficult to detect using current genome annotation methods that rely on the sequence signature of purifying selection. In contrast to young de novo genes, older de novo genes have a codon usage that is similar to the rest of the genome. They evolve slowly and are under stronger purifying selection. Some of the oldest de novo genes evolve under stronger selection pressure than the ancestral gene they overlap, suggesting an evolutionary tug of war between the ancestral and the de novo gene.

Abstract

New protein-coding genes can originate either through modification of existing genes or de novo. Recently, the importance of de novo origination has been recognized in eukaryotes, although eukaryotic genes originated de novo are relatively rare and difficult to identify. In contrast, viruses contain many de novo genes, namely those in which an existing gene has been "overprinted" by a new open reading frame, a process that generates a new protein-coding gene overlapping the ancestral gene. We analyzed the evolution of 12 experimentally validated viral genes that originated de novo and estimated their relative ages. We found that young de novo genes have a different codon usage from the rest of the genome. They evolve rapidly and are under positive or weak purifying selection. Thus, young de novo genes might have strain-specific functions, or no function, and would be difficult to detect using current genome annotation methods that rely on the sequence signature of purifying selection. In contrast to young de novo genes, older de novo genes have a codon usage that is similar to the rest of the genome. They evolve slowly and are under stronger purifying selection. Some of the oldest de novo genes evolve under stronger selection pressure than the ancestral gene they overlap, suggesting an evolutionary tug of war between the ancestral and the de novo gene.

Statistics

Citations

41 citations in Web of Science®
43 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

87 downloads since deposited on 07 Feb 2013
25 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:07 Feb 2013 15:12
Last Modified:11 Aug 2017 06:26
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0737-4038
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/mss179
PubMed ID:22821011

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 471kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations