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Orang-utan genes in space and time: the impact of evolutionary processes of diversification on Bornean orang-utans


Arora, N (2012). Orang-utan genes in space and time: the impact of evolutionary processes of diversification on Bornean orang-utans. Frontiers of Biogeography, 4(2):65-68.

Abstract

The evolutionary processes driving patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation, and thus speciation, are poorly understood. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the effects of environmental and biological mechanisms on gene flow and genetic diversity in the Bornean orang‐utans. Specifically, I examined the effects of Pleistocene climatic changes and riverine barriers as well as sex‐biased dispersal. My results suggest that current Bornean orang‐utan populations are the result of a recent radiation throughout the island, following the probable confinement within a glacial refugium in the Pleistocene. Furthermore, I found evidence for an extreme pattern of female philopatry and male‐biased dispersal. These processes have led to highly structured genetic diversity, rendering the orang‐utans particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic effects and future climatic changes.

Abstract

The evolutionary processes driving patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation, and thus speciation, are poorly understood. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the effects of environmental and biological mechanisms on gene flow and genetic diversity in the Bornean orang‐utans. Specifically, I examined the effects of Pleistocene climatic changes and riverine barriers as well as sex‐biased dispersal. My results suggest that current Bornean orang‐utan populations are the result of a recent radiation throughout the island, following the probable confinement within a glacial refugium in the Pleistocene. Furthermore, I found evidence for an extreme pattern of female philopatry and male‐biased dispersal. These processes have led to highly structured genetic diversity, rendering the orang‐utans particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic effects and future climatic changes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:12 Feb 2013 15:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:24
Publisher:International Biogeography Society
ISSN:1948-6596
Official URL:http://escholarship.org/uc/item/97b4705z

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