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Mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle following high-altitude exposure


Jacobs, R A; Boushel, R; Wright-Paradis, C; Calbet, Jose A L; Robach, P; Gnaiger, E; Lundby, C (2013). Mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle following high-altitude exposure. Experimental Physiology, 98(1):245-255.

Abstract

Studies regarding mitochondrial modifications in human skeletal muscle following acclimatization to high altitude are conflicting, and these inconsistencies may be due to the prevalence of representing mitochondrial function through static and isolated measurements of specific mitochondrial characteristics. The aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate mitochondrial function in response to high-altitude acclimatization through measurements of respiratory control in the vastus lateralis muscle. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from 10 lowland natives prior to and again after a total of 9–11 days of exposure to 4559 m. High-resolution respirometry was performed on the muscle samples to compare respiratory chain function and respiratory capacities. Respirometric analysis revealed that mitochondrial function was largely unaffected, because high-altitude exposure did not affect the capacity for fat oxidation or individualized respiration capacity through either complex I or complex II. Respiratory chain functionremained unaltered, becauseneither couplingnor respiratory control changed in response to hypoxic exposure. High-altitude acclimatization did, however, show a tendency (P =0.059) to limit mass-specific maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity. These data suggest that 9–11 days of exposure to high altitude do not markedly modify integrated measures of mitochondrial functional capacity in skeletal muscle despite significant decrements in the concentrations of enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

Abstract

Studies regarding mitochondrial modifications in human skeletal muscle following acclimatization to high altitude are conflicting, and these inconsistencies may be due to the prevalence of representing mitochondrial function through static and isolated measurements of specific mitochondrial characteristics. The aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate mitochondrial function in response to high-altitude acclimatization through measurements of respiratory control in the vastus lateralis muscle. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from 10 lowland natives prior to and again after a total of 9–11 days of exposure to 4559 m. High-resolution respirometry was performed on the muscle samples to compare respiratory chain function and respiratory capacities. Respirometric analysis revealed that mitochondrial function was largely unaffected, because high-altitude exposure did not affect the capacity for fat oxidation or individualized respiration capacity through either complex I or complex II. Respiratory chain functionremained unaltered, becauseneither couplingnor respiratory control changed in response to hypoxic exposure. High-altitude acclimatization did, however, show a tendency (P =0.059) to limit mass-specific maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity. These data suggest that 9–11 days of exposure to high altitude do not markedly modify integrated measures of mitochondrial functional capacity in skeletal muscle despite significant decrements in the concentrations of enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:31 Jan 2013 15:04
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:25
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0958-0670
Funders:Novo Nordisk Fonden, Fonds de la Recherche en Sante Quebec
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1113/expphysiol.2012.066092
PubMed ID:22636256

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