Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

High-resolution versus standard-resolution cardiovascular MR myocardial perfusion imaging for the detection of coronary artery disease


Motwani, M; Maredia, N; Fairbairn, T A; Kozerke, S; Radjenovic, A; Greenwood, J P; Plein, S (2012). High-resolution versus standard-resolution cardiovascular MR myocardial perfusion imaging for the detection of coronary artery disease. Circulation. Cardiovascular Imaging, 5(3):306-313.

Abstract

Background: Although accelerated high-spatial-resolution cardiovascular MR (CMR) myocardial perfusion imaging has been shown to be clinically feasible, there has not yet been a direct comparison with standard-resolution methods. We hypothesized that higher spatial resolution detects more subendocardial ischemia and leads to greater diagnostic accuracy for the detection coronary artery disease. This study compared the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution and standard-resolution CMR myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.
Methods and Results: A total of 111 patients were recruited to undergo 2 separate perfusion-CMR studies at 1.5 T, 1 with standard-resolution (2.5×2.5 mm in-plane) and 1 with high-resolution (1.6×1.6 mm in-plane) acquisition. High-resolution acquisition was facilitated by 8-fold k-t broad linear speed-up technique acceleration. Two observers visually graded perfusion in each myocardial segment on a 4-point scale. Segmental scores were summed to produce a perfusion score for each patient. All patients underwent invasive coronary angiography and coronary artery disease was defined as stenosis ≥50% luminal diameter (quantitative coronary angiography). CMR data were successfully obtained in 100 patients. In patients with coronary artery disease (n=70), more segments were determined to have subendocardial ischemia with high-resolution than with standard-resolution acquisition (279 versus 108; P<0.001). High-resolution acquisition had a greater diagnostic accuracy than standard resolution for identifying single-vessel disease (area under the curve, 0.88 versus 0.73; P<0.001) or multivessel disease (area under the curve, 0.98 versus 0.91; P=0.002) and overall (area under the curve, 0.93 versus 0.83; P<0.001).
Conclusions: High-resolution perfusion-CMR has greater overall diagnostic accuracy than standard-resolution acquisition for the detection of coronary artery disease in both single- and multivessel disease and detects more subendocardial ischemia.

Abstract

Background: Although accelerated high-spatial-resolution cardiovascular MR (CMR) myocardial perfusion imaging has been shown to be clinically feasible, there has not yet been a direct comparison with standard-resolution methods. We hypothesized that higher spatial resolution detects more subendocardial ischemia and leads to greater diagnostic accuracy for the detection coronary artery disease. This study compared the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution and standard-resolution CMR myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.
Methods and Results: A total of 111 patients were recruited to undergo 2 separate perfusion-CMR studies at 1.5 T, 1 with standard-resolution (2.5×2.5 mm in-plane) and 1 with high-resolution (1.6×1.6 mm in-plane) acquisition. High-resolution acquisition was facilitated by 8-fold k-t broad linear speed-up technique acceleration. Two observers visually graded perfusion in each myocardial segment on a 4-point scale. Segmental scores were summed to produce a perfusion score for each patient. All patients underwent invasive coronary angiography and coronary artery disease was defined as stenosis ≥50% luminal diameter (quantitative coronary angiography). CMR data were successfully obtained in 100 patients. In patients with coronary artery disease (n=70), more segments were determined to have subendocardial ischemia with high-resolution than with standard-resolution acquisition (279 versus 108; P<0.001). High-resolution acquisition had a greater diagnostic accuracy than standard resolution for identifying single-vessel disease (area under the curve, 0.88 versus 0.73; P<0.001) or multivessel disease (area under the curve, 0.98 versus 0.91; P=0.002) and overall (area under the curve, 0.93 versus 0.83; P<0.001).
Conclusions: High-resolution perfusion-CMR has greater overall diagnostic accuracy than standard-resolution acquisition for the detection of coronary artery disease in both single- and multivessel disease and detects more subendocardial ischemia.

Statistics

Citations

23 citations in Web of Science®
22 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 14 Feb 2013
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:14 Feb 2013 09:51
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 19:06
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1941-9651
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.111.971796

Download