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Technique of supraceliac balloon control of the aorta during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms


Berland, Todd L; Veith, Frank J; Cayne, Neal S; Mehta, Manish; Mayer, Dieter; Lachat, Mario (2013). Technique of supraceliac balloon control of the aorta during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 57(1):272-275.

Abstract

Endovascular aneurysm repair is being used increasingly to treat ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs). Approximately 25% of RAAAs undergo complete circulatory collapse before or during the procedure. Patient survival depends on obtaining and maintaining supraceliac balloon control until the endograft is fully deployed. This is accomplished with a sheath-supported compliant balloon inserted via the groin contralateral to the side to be used for insertion of the endograft main body. After the main body is fully deployed, a second balloon is placed within the endograft, and the first balloon is removed so that extension limbs can be placed in the contralateral side. A third balloon can be placed via the contralateral side and ipsilateral extensions deployed as necessary. This technique of supraceliac balloon control is important to achieving good outcomes with RAAAs. In addition to minimizing blood loss, this technique minimizes visceral ischemia and maintains aortic control until the aneurysm rupture site is fully excluded.

Abstract

Endovascular aneurysm repair is being used increasingly to treat ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs). Approximately 25% of RAAAs undergo complete circulatory collapse before or during the procedure. Patient survival depends on obtaining and maintaining supraceliac balloon control until the endograft is fully deployed. This is accomplished with a sheath-supported compliant balloon inserted via the groin contralateral to the side to be used for insertion of the endograft main body. After the main body is fully deployed, a second balloon is placed within the endograft, and the first balloon is removed so that extension limbs can be placed in the contralateral side. A third balloon can be placed via the contralateral side and ipsilateral extensions deployed as necessary. This technique of supraceliac balloon control is important to achieving good outcomes with RAAAs. In addition to minimizing blood loss, this technique minimizes visceral ischemia and maintains aortic control until the aneurysm rupture site is fully excluded.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:25 Mar 2013 08:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:27
Publisher:Mosby, Inc.
ISSN:0741-5214
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2012.09.001
PubMed ID:23159478

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