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Effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN) on estradiol production in bovine granulosa cells from small and large follicles


Shimizu, T; Miyauchi, K; Shirasuna, K; Bollwein, H; Magata, F; Murayama, C; Miyamoto, A (2012). Effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN) on estradiol production in bovine granulosa cells from small and large follicles. Toxicology in vitro, 26(7):1134-1142.

Abstract

In cows, postpartum uterine infection due to bacteria that produce lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN) leads to ovarian dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of LPS and/or PGN on estradiol production from granulosa cells from small and large follicles in the bovine ovary. Granulosa cells from small and large ovarian follicles were exposed to LPS and/or PGN in vitro. LPS inhibited the expression of TLR4, CD14, MD2 and NOD1 genes in FSH-treated granulosa cells from small follicles. LPS suppressed estradiol (E2) production in granulosa cells from small and large follicles, while PGN inhibited E2 production in granulosa cells from large follicles. LPS or PGN did not affect granulosa cell survival. Although LPS alone suppressed E2 production in granulosa cells from small and large follicles, E2 production was not further suppressed when PGN was added to culture medium with LPS alone. Our data demonstrated that susceptibility to LPS or PGN in granulosa cells depends on the follicle developmental stage. The results of the present study suggest that ovarian dysfunction in cows with postpartum uterine infection may be caused by inhibitory effects of LPS and PGN on E2 production in granulosa cells.

Abstract

In cows, postpartum uterine infection due to bacteria that produce lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN) leads to ovarian dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of LPS and/or PGN on estradiol production from granulosa cells from small and large follicles in the bovine ovary. Granulosa cells from small and large ovarian follicles were exposed to LPS and/or PGN in vitro. LPS inhibited the expression of TLR4, CD14, MD2 and NOD1 genes in FSH-treated granulosa cells from small follicles. LPS suppressed estradiol (E2) production in granulosa cells from small and large follicles, while PGN inhibited E2 production in granulosa cells from large follicles. LPS or PGN did not affect granulosa cell survival. Although LPS alone suppressed E2 production in granulosa cells from small and large follicles, E2 production was not further suppressed when PGN was added to culture medium with LPS alone. Our data demonstrated that susceptibility to LPS or PGN in granulosa cells depends on the follicle developmental stage. The results of the present study suggest that ovarian dysfunction in cows with postpartum uterine infection may be caused by inhibitory effects of LPS and PGN on E2 production in granulosa cells.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords: Lipopolysaccharide; Peptidoglycan; Estradiol; Granulosa cell; Cow; LH receptor
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:31 Jan 2013 11:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:27
Publisher:Pergamon
ISSN:0887-2333
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2012.06.014
PubMed ID:22771338

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