Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Cerebral blood flow dynamics during pain processing in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome


Duschek, S; Mannhart, T; Winkelmann, A; Merzoug, K; Werner, N S; Schuepbach, D; Montoya, P (2012). Cerebral blood flow dynamics during pain processing in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. Psychosomatic Medicine, 74(8):802-809.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Increased cerebral blood flow during processing of acute pain has repeatedly been observed in fibromyalgia syndrome. The study investigated the time dynamics of the pain-related hemodynamic response in fibromyalgia using transcranial Doppler sonography.
METHODS: In 25 women with fibromyalgia and 25 healthy participants, blood flow velocities in the anterior and middle cerebral arteries of both hemispheres were recorded, while heat stimuli of 45°C were applied to their forearms. Thermal pain threshold and subjective pain experience during stimulation were assessed, and the participants completed the McGill Pain Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.
RESULTS: The early component of the blood flow response in both anterior cerebral arteries, that is, the steep flow increase during the initial stimulation period, was more pronounced in the patients than in the controls (mean [standard deviation] = 1.28% [1.85%] versus 0.24% [1.58%], p = .04). The patients showed lower pain threshold (p = .018), stronger sensory and affective pain experience (p < .001), and increased values on all questionnaire scales (all p values < .001). Although higher scores on each of the scales were associated with a stronger early blood flow response (r values ranging from 0.17 to 0.36), clinical pain severity proved to be the best predictor (β = .33, p = .02).
CONCLUSIONS: The increased blood flow response in the anterior cerebral arteries reflects hyperactivity of medial structures of the neuromatrix of nociception, structures involved in the processing of affective and cognitive aspects of pain. Aberrances in cerebral blood flow related to fibromyalgia and its clinical characteristics become particularly apparent in the enhancement of the initial component of the hemodynamic response.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Increased cerebral blood flow during processing of acute pain has repeatedly been observed in fibromyalgia syndrome. The study investigated the time dynamics of the pain-related hemodynamic response in fibromyalgia using transcranial Doppler sonography.
METHODS: In 25 women with fibromyalgia and 25 healthy participants, blood flow velocities in the anterior and middle cerebral arteries of both hemispheres were recorded, while heat stimuli of 45°C were applied to their forearms. Thermal pain threshold and subjective pain experience during stimulation were assessed, and the participants completed the McGill Pain Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.
RESULTS: The early component of the blood flow response in both anterior cerebral arteries, that is, the steep flow increase during the initial stimulation period, was more pronounced in the patients than in the controls (mean [standard deviation] = 1.28% [1.85%] versus 0.24% [1.58%], p = .04). The patients showed lower pain threshold (p = .018), stronger sensory and affective pain experience (p < .001), and increased values on all questionnaire scales (all p values < .001). Although higher scores on each of the scales were associated with a stronger early blood flow response (r values ranging from 0.17 to 0.36), clinical pain severity proved to be the best predictor (β = .33, p = .02).
CONCLUSIONS: The increased blood flow response in the anterior cerebral arteries reflects hyperactivity of medial structures of the neuromatrix of nociception, structures involved in the processing of affective and cognitive aspects of pain. Aberrances in cerebral blood flow related to fibromyalgia and its clinical characteristics become particularly apparent in the enhancement of the initial component of the hemodynamic response.

Statistics

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2012
Deposited On:15 Feb 2013 14:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:28
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0033-3174
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0b013e3182676d08
PubMed ID:23006430

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher