Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Aggregate investment externalities and macroprudential regulation


Rochet, Jean-Charles; Gersbach, Hans (2012). Aggregate investment externalities and macroprudential regulation. Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, 44(S2):73-109.

Abstract

Empirical evidence shows that banks tend to lend too much during booms, and too littleduring recessions. Thus, instead of dampening productivity shocks, the banking sectortends to exacerbate them, leading to excessive fluctuations of credit, output and assetprices. We propose a simple explanation for this dysfunctionality of credit markets. Thisexplanation relies on three ingredients that are characteristic of modern banks’ activities.The first ingredient is moral hazard: banks are supposed to monitor the small and mediumsized enterprises that borrow from them, but they may shirk on their monitoring activities,unless they are given sufficient informational rents. These rents limit the amount thatinvestors are ready to lend them, to a multiple of the banks’ own capital. The secondingredient is the banks’ high exposure to aggregate shocks: banks’ assets have positivelycorrelated returns. Finally the third ingredient is the ease with which modern banks canreallocate capital between different lines of business. At the competitive equilibrium ofthe financial sector, banks offer privately optimal contracts to their investors but thesecontracts are not socially optimal: banks’ decisions of reallocating capital react too stronglyto aggregate shocks. This is because banks do not internalize the impact of their decisionson asset prices. This generates excessive fluctuations of credit, output and asset prices. Weexamine the efficacy of several possible policy responses to this dysfunctionality of creditmarkets, and show that it can provide a rationale for macroprudential regulation.Keywords: Bank Credit Fluctuations, Macro-prudential Regulation, Investment Externalities.JEL: G21, G28, D86

Abstract

Empirical evidence shows that banks tend to lend too much during booms, and too littleduring recessions. Thus, instead of dampening productivity shocks, the banking sectortends to exacerbate them, leading to excessive fluctuations of credit, output and assetprices. We propose a simple explanation for this dysfunctionality of credit markets. Thisexplanation relies on three ingredients that are characteristic of modern banks’ activities.The first ingredient is moral hazard: banks are supposed to monitor the small and mediumsized enterprises that borrow from them, but they may shirk on their monitoring activities,unless they are given sufficient informational rents. These rents limit the amount thatinvestors are ready to lend them, to a multiple of the banks’ own capital. The secondingredient is the banks’ high exposure to aggregate shocks: banks’ assets have positivelycorrelated returns. Finally the third ingredient is the ease with which modern banks canreallocate capital between different lines of business. At the competitive equilibrium ofthe financial sector, banks offer privately optimal contracts to their investors but thesecontracts are not socially optimal: banks’ decisions of reallocating capital react too stronglyto aggregate shocks. This is because banks do not internalize the impact of their decisionson asset prices. This generates excessive fluctuations of credit, output and asset prices. Weexamine the efficacy of several possible policy responses to this dysfunctionality of creditmarkets, and show that it can provide a rationale for macroprudential regulation.Keywords: Bank Credit Fluctuations, Macro-prudential Regulation, Investment Externalities.JEL: G21, G28, D86

Statistics

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

8 downloads since deposited on 01 Feb 2013
3 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Banking and Finance
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:01 Feb 2013 13:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:28
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0022-2879
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1538-4616.2012.00554.x
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:4664

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 946kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations