Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Improving outcome after stroke: overcoming the translational roadblock


Endres, M; Engelhardt, B; Koistinaho, J; Lindvall, O; Meairs, S; Mohr, J P; Planas, A; Rothwell, N; Schwaninger, M; Schwab, M E; Vivien, D; Wieloch, T; Dirnagl, U (2008). Improving outcome after stroke: overcoming the translational roadblock. Cerebrovascular Diseases, 25(3):268-278.

Abstract

Stroke poses a massive burden of disease, yet we have few effective therapies. The paucity of therapeutic options stands contrary to intensive research efforts. The failure of these past investments demands a thorough re-examination of the pathophysiology of ischaemic brain injury. Several critical areas hold the key to overcoming the translational roadblock: (1) vascular occlusion: current recanalization strategies have limited effectiveness and may have serious side effects; (2) complexity of stroke pathobiology: therapy must acknowledge the 'Janus-faced' nature of many stroke targets and must identify endogenous neuroprotective and repair mechanisms; (3) inflammation and brain-immune-system interaction: inflammation contributes to lesion expansion, but is also instrumental in lesion containment and repair; stroke outcome is modulated by the interaction of the injured brain with the immune system; (4) regeneration: the potential of the brain for reorganization, plasticity and repair after injury is much greater than previously thought; (5) confounding factors, long-term outcome and predictive modelling. These 5 areas are linked on all levels and therefore need to be tackled by an integrative approach and innovative therapeutic strategies.

Abstract

Stroke poses a massive burden of disease, yet we have few effective therapies. The paucity of therapeutic options stands contrary to intensive research efforts. The failure of these past investments demands a thorough re-examination of the pathophysiology of ischaemic brain injury. Several critical areas hold the key to overcoming the translational roadblock: (1) vascular occlusion: current recanalization strategies have limited effectiveness and may have serious side effects; (2) complexity of stroke pathobiology: therapy must acknowledge the 'Janus-faced' nature of many stroke targets and must identify endogenous neuroprotective and repair mechanisms; (3) inflammation and brain-immune-system interaction: inflammation contributes to lesion expansion, but is also instrumental in lesion containment and repair; stroke outcome is modulated by the interaction of the injured brain with the immune system; (4) regeneration: the potential of the brain for reorganization, plasticity and repair after injury is much greater than previously thought; (5) confounding factors, long-term outcome and predictive modelling. These 5 areas are linked on all levels and therefore need to be tackled by an integrative approach and innovative therapeutic strategies.

Statistics

Citations

153 citations in Web of Science®
164 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

11 downloads since deposited on 15 Dec 2008
10 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Brain Research Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:15 Dec 2008 11:39
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 15:47
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1015-9770
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000118039
PubMed ID:18292653

Download

Download PDF  'Improving outcome after stroke: overcoming the translational roadblock'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher