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Efficient and comprehensive haptic information for grasp control in upper-limb prosthetics


Damian, Dana. Efficient and comprehensive haptic information for grasp control in upper-limb prosthetics. 2012, University of Zurich, Faculty of Economics.

Abstract

Defining the Self is a long-standing quest, which has been addressed by psychol-ogists, mathematicians and philosophers. Prosthetics has become an excitingbranch of robotics that carries the potential of answering this question, usinga synthetic or robotic framework, due to the controllability of the relation be-tween the prosthetic device and the human wearer in the interaction with theenvironment. The incorporation of the robotic prosthesis as part of the wearer’sbody has been found to be a sensorimotor artificial transformation subjected tocomplex technological challenges due to the unstructured environments in whichhumans operate. This thesis addresses the technological and information-relatedchallenges of haptic interfaces -both haptic sensing and displays- for upper-limbprostheses. It introduces the notion of efficient feedback in prosthetics, a con-cept through which, technologically, morphology in the design of tactile sensorsand haptic displays enhances the relayed information using minimal resources(e.g., electronical, computational and physical). Within the same concept, ex-tended to the information dimension of sensing, this thesis proposes the natureof haptic information which needs to be provided to the prosthesis wearer for acomprehensive environmental representation and an efficient grasp.We show that a quantitative feedback description of proprioceptive sensing,e.g., grip force strength, and exteroceptive sensing, e.g., object slip speed, forprosthetic hands, endows prosthesis users with a robust guidance towards stablegrasp, i.e., grip force within safe margins against slip. Additionally, we showthe distinct role of grip force and slip speed feedback in regulating the artificialgrasp. Following up on these ideas, we developed a haptic device that displaysboth force and slip in a quantitative way and reveals efficient design principlesfor prosthetics.We also look at efficient design principles of tactile sensing systems for ex-tracting enhanced haptic information. Ridged patterns on an artificial skin areinspected for their potential to encode haptic stimuli in their morphology duringstatic and dynamic events. We developed a ridged artificial skin that detectsstimulus force, slip occurrence, speed and location, by using a single force sensor.Based on evolutionary algorithms, we provide insights into the trade-off betweentactile sensing resolution and sensitivity, as an expression of the number andspatial distribution of ridges, respectively.The thesis deepens the understanding of artificial sensorimotor transforma-tions in prosthetic systems and shows the potential of exploiting morphologyfor efficient sensory feedback schemes in prosthetics.

Abstract

Defining the Self is a long-standing quest, which has been addressed by psychol-ogists, mathematicians and philosophers. Prosthetics has become an excitingbranch of robotics that carries the potential of answering this question, usinga synthetic or robotic framework, due to the controllability of the relation be-tween the prosthetic device and the human wearer in the interaction with theenvironment. The incorporation of the robotic prosthesis as part of the wearer’sbody has been found to be a sensorimotor artificial transformation subjected tocomplex technological challenges due to the unstructured environments in whichhumans operate. This thesis addresses the technological and information-relatedchallenges of haptic interfaces -both haptic sensing and displays- for upper-limbprostheses. It introduces the notion of efficient feedback in prosthetics, a con-cept through which, technologically, morphology in the design of tactile sensorsand haptic displays enhances the relayed information using minimal resources(e.g., electronical, computational and physical). Within the same concept, ex-tended to the information dimension of sensing, this thesis proposes the natureof haptic information which needs to be provided to the prosthesis wearer for acomprehensive environmental representation and an efficient grasp.We show that a quantitative feedback description of proprioceptive sensing,e.g., grip force strength, and exteroceptive sensing, e.g., object slip speed, forprosthetic hands, endows prosthesis users with a robust guidance towards stablegrasp, i.e., grip force within safe margins against slip. Additionally, we showthe distinct role of grip force and slip speed feedback in regulating the artificialgrasp. Following up on these ideas, we developed a haptic device that displaysboth force and slip in a quantitative way and reveals efficient design principlesfor prosthetics.We also look at efficient design principles of tactile sensing systems for ex-tracting enhanced haptic information. Ridged patterns on an artificial skin areinspected for their potential to encode haptic stimuli in their morphology duringstatic and dynamic events. We developed a ridged artificial skin that detectsstimulus force, slip occurrence, speed and location, by using a single force sensor.Based on evolutionary algorithms, we provide insights into the trade-off betweentactile sensing resolution and sensitivity, as an expression of the number andspatial distribution of ridges, respectively.The thesis deepens the understanding of artificial sensorimotor transforma-tions in prosthetic systems and shows the potential of exploiting morphologyfor efficient sensory feedback schemes in prosthetics.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Pfeifer Rolf, Gassert Roger
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:05 Feb 2013 08:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:28
Number of Pages:169
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&CON_LNG=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=007575389
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:7929

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