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“Enforced” vs. “casual” transparency - Findings from IT-supported financial advisory encounters


Nussbaumer, Philipp; Matter, Inu Sarah; Schwabe, Gerhard (2012). “Enforced” vs. “casual” transparency - Findings from IT-supported financial advisory encounters. ACM Transactions on Management Information Systems, 3(2):11.

Abstract

In sales-oriented service encounters like financial advice, the client may perceive information and interest asymmetries as a lack of transparency regarding the advisor’s activities. In this article, we will discuss two design iterations of a supportive tabletop application that we built to increase process and information transparency as compared to the traditional pen and paper encounters. While the first iteration’s design was “enforcing” transparency and therefore proved to be a failure [Nussbaumer et al. 2011], we built the second iteration on design rationales enabling more “casual” transparency. Experimental evaluations show that the redesigned system significantly increases the client’s perceived transparency, her perceived control of the encounter and improves her perceived trustworthiness of and satisfaction with the encounter. With these findings, we contribute to (1) insight into the role of transparency advisory encounter design; (2) design solutions for establishing particular facets of transparency and their potential instantiations in tabletop systems; and (3) insight into the process of designing for transparency with socio-technical artifacts that are emergent as a result of design activities.

Abstract

In sales-oriented service encounters like financial advice, the client may perceive information and interest asymmetries as a lack of transparency regarding the advisor’s activities. In this article, we will discuss two design iterations of a supportive tabletop application that we built to increase process and information transparency as compared to the traditional pen and paper encounters. While the first iteration’s design was “enforcing” transparency and therefore proved to be a failure [Nussbaumer et al. 2011], we built the second iteration on design rationales enabling more “casual” transparency. Experimental evaluations show that the redesigned system significantly increases the client’s perceived transparency, her perceived control of the encounter and improves her perceived trustworthiness of and satisfaction with the encounter. With these findings, we contribute to (1) insight into the role of transparency advisory encounter design; (2) design solutions for establishing particular facets of transparency and their potential instantiations in tabletop systems; and (3) insight into the process of designing for transparency with socio-technical artifacts that are emergent as a result of design activities.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:05 Feb 2013 08:37
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:29
Publisher:Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.
ISSN:2158-656X
Additional Information:© ACM, 2012. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in ACM Transactions on Management Information Systems (TMIS), Vol. 3, No. 2, (2012) http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2229156.2229161
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/2229156.2229161
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:7321

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