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Biopsychosocial outcomes in individuals with and without spinal cord injury: a Swiss comparative study


Geyh, S; Nick, E; Stirnimann, D; Ehrat, S; Müller, R; Michel, F (2012). Biopsychosocial outcomes in individuals with and without spinal cord injury: a Swiss comparative study. Spinal Cord, 50(8):614-622.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: Multicentre controlled study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate if individuals with and without spinal cord injury (SCI) differ in biopsychosocial variables according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). SETTING: Participants were recruited through three major SCI rehabilitation centres in Switzerland. METHODS: A convenience sample of people with SCI (N=102) and a matched non-SCI sample (N=73) were compared according to secondary conditions, pain, depressive symptoms, participation, social support, self-efficacy, self-esteem, coping and sense of coherence. Difference tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses to predict the likelihood of group membership were calculated. RESULTS: People with SCI reported more health conditions, higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms, worse pain and pain interference, lower level of participation and social support, lower self-efficacy, self-esteem and task- and emotion-oriented coping. The two samples did not differ in satisfaction with social support, in use of avoidance-oriented coping and in sense of coherence. Health conditions, pain interference, participation and age were found to be significant predictors of the likelihood of group membership. In the logistic regression models, the number of health conditions, limitations due to health conditions, pain interference, participation, task-oriented coping and age are significant predictors of group membership, accounting for 55% of variation. CONCLUSION: Health conditions, pain interference and participation seemed to be the areas of biopsychosocial functioning that are substantially influenced by SCI. Potential buffering resources seem to be diminished in individuals with SCI. In rehabilitation practice, prevention of secondary conditions, treatment of pain, enhancement of participation and strengthening resources should be addressed.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: Multicentre controlled study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate if individuals with and without spinal cord injury (SCI) differ in biopsychosocial variables according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). SETTING: Participants were recruited through three major SCI rehabilitation centres in Switzerland. METHODS: A convenience sample of people with SCI (N=102) and a matched non-SCI sample (N=73) were compared according to secondary conditions, pain, depressive symptoms, participation, social support, self-efficacy, self-esteem, coping and sense of coherence. Difference tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses to predict the likelihood of group membership were calculated. RESULTS: People with SCI reported more health conditions, higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms, worse pain and pain interference, lower level of participation and social support, lower self-efficacy, self-esteem and task- and emotion-oriented coping. The two samples did not differ in satisfaction with social support, in use of avoidance-oriented coping and in sense of coherence. Health conditions, pain interference, participation and age were found to be significant predictors of the likelihood of group membership. In the logistic regression models, the number of health conditions, limitations due to health conditions, pain interference, participation, task-oriented coping and age are significant predictors of group membership, accounting for 55% of variation. CONCLUSION: Health conditions, pain interference and participation seemed to be the areas of biopsychosocial functioning that are substantially influenced by SCI. Potential buffering resources seem to be diminished in individuals with SCI. In rehabilitation practice, prevention of secondary conditions, treatment of pain, enhancement of participation and strengthening resources should be addressed.

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12 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2012
Deposited On:05 Feb 2013 14:19
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 19:31
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1362-4393
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/sc.2012.21
PubMed ID:22410847

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