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In contrast to sheep, goats adapt to dietary calcium restriction by increasing intestinal absorption of calcium


Wilkens, Mirja; Richter, Julia; Fraser, David R; Liesegang, Annette; Breves, Gerhard; Schröder, Bernd (2012). In contrast to sheep, goats adapt to dietary calcium restriction by increasing intestinal absorption of calcium. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology, 163(3-4):396-406.

Abstract

Many studies aimed at understanding calcium homeostasis in the cow use sheep or goats as ruminant models. However, the comparability of relevant homeostatic processes between ruminant species has not been assessed. Therefore, we investigated whether the mechanisms of maintaining calcium homeostasis are similar in different ruminant species. Dietary calcium of goats was restricted along with treatment with calcitriol in a similar protocol to that in a recent study with sheep. Plasma calcium and phosphate and parameters of bone metabolism were analysed. Gastrointestinal calcium transport was characterised in vitro in Ussing chambers. The expression of apical epithelial calcium channels, calbindin-D(9K), and the basolateral plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In contrast to sheep, the goats were able to compensate for low dietary calcium supply by increasing active calcium absorption in the small intestine, especially in the jejunum. As in sheep, the observed ruminal calcium transport of goats was affected neither by the calcium restricted diet nor by the calcitriol treatment, thus indicating the presence of an alternative, vitamin D-independent mechanism of calcium transport in the forestomachs. These results demonstrate that mechanisms for maintaining calcium homeostasis differ significantly between ruminant species.

Abstract

Many studies aimed at understanding calcium homeostasis in the cow use sheep or goats as ruminant models. However, the comparability of relevant homeostatic processes between ruminant species has not been assessed. Therefore, we investigated whether the mechanisms of maintaining calcium homeostasis are similar in different ruminant species. Dietary calcium of goats was restricted along with treatment with calcitriol in a similar protocol to that in a recent study with sheep. Plasma calcium and phosphate and parameters of bone metabolism were analysed. Gastrointestinal calcium transport was characterised in vitro in Ussing chambers. The expression of apical epithelial calcium channels, calbindin-D(9K), and the basolateral plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In contrast to sheep, the goats were able to compensate for low dietary calcium supply by increasing active calcium absorption in the small intestine, especially in the jejunum. As in sheep, the observed ruminal calcium transport of goats was affected neither by the calcium restricted diet nor by the calcitriol treatment, thus indicating the presence of an alternative, vitamin D-independent mechanism of calcium transport in the forestomachs. These results demonstrate that mechanisms for maintaining calcium homeostasis differ significantly between ruminant species.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Animal Nutrition
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:Calcitriol 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Ruminants Goats TRPV6 Calbindin-D9K PMCA Ussing chamber
Language:English
Date:28 June 2012
Deposited On:20 Feb 2013 08:04
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:30
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1095-6433
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2012.06.011
PubMed ID:22776717

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