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The interaction of amylin with other hormones in the control of eating


Lutz, T A (2013). The interaction of amylin with other hormones in the control of eating. Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism, 15(2):99-111.

Abstract

Twenty years of research established amylin as an important control of energy homeostasis. Amylin controls nutrient and energy fluxes by reducing energy intake, by modulating nutrient utilization via an inhibition of postprandial glucagon secretion and by increasing energy disposal via a prevention of compensatory decreases of energy expenditure in weight reduced individuals. Like many other gastrointestinal hormones, amylin is secreted in response to meals and it reduces eating by promoting meal-ending satiation. Not surprisingly, amylin interacts with many of these hormones to control eating. These interactions seem to occur at different levels because amylin seems to mediate the eating inhibitory effect of some of these gastrointestinal hormones, and the combination of some of these hormones seems to lead to a stronger reduction in eating than single hormones alone. Amylin's effect on eating is thought to be mediated by a stimulation of specific amylin receptors in the area postrema. Secondary brain sites that were defined to mediate amylin action - and hence potential additional sites of interaction with other hormones - include the nucleus of the solitary tract, the lateral parabrachial nucleus, the lateral hypothalamic area and other hypothalamic nuclei. The focus of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of amylin interactions in the control of eating. In most cases, these interactions have only been studied at a descriptive rather than a mechanistic level and despite the clear knowledge on primary sites of amylin action, the interaction sites between amylin and other hormones are often unknown.

Abstract

Twenty years of research established amylin as an important control of energy homeostasis. Amylin controls nutrient and energy fluxes by reducing energy intake, by modulating nutrient utilization via an inhibition of postprandial glucagon secretion and by increasing energy disposal via a prevention of compensatory decreases of energy expenditure in weight reduced individuals. Like many other gastrointestinal hormones, amylin is secreted in response to meals and it reduces eating by promoting meal-ending satiation. Not surprisingly, amylin interacts with many of these hormones to control eating. These interactions seem to occur at different levels because amylin seems to mediate the eating inhibitory effect of some of these gastrointestinal hormones, and the combination of some of these hormones seems to lead to a stronger reduction in eating than single hormones alone. Amylin's effect on eating is thought to be mediated by a stimulation of specific amylin receptors in the area postrema. Secondary brain sites that were defined to mediate amylin action - and hence potential additional sites of interaction with other hormones - include the nucleus of the solitary tract, the lateral parabrachial nucleus, the lateral hypothalamic area and other hypothalamic nuclei. The focus of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of amylin interactions in the control of eating. In most cases, these interactions have only been studied at a descriptive rather than a mechanistic level and despite the clear knowledge on primary sites of amylin action, the interaction sites between amylin and other hormones are often unknown.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:14 Feb 2013 13:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:32
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1462-8902
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-1326.2012.01670.x
PubMed ID:22862822

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