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Expression of nogo-a is decreased with increasing gestational age in the human fetal brain


Haybaeck, J; Lienos, I C; Dulay, R J; Bettermann, K; Miller, C L; Wälchli, T; Frei, K; Virgintino, D; Rizzi, M; Weis, S (2012). Expression of nogo-a is decreased with increasing gestational age in the human fetal brain. Developmental Neuroscience, 34(5):402-416.

Abstract

Nogo is a member of the reticulon family. Our understanding of the physiological functions of the Nogo-A protein has grown over the last few years, and this molecule is now recognized as one of the most important axonal regrowth inhibitors present in central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Nogo-A plays other important roles in nervous system development, epilepsy, vascular physiology, muscle pathology, stroke, inflammation, and CNS tumors. Since the exact role of Nogo-A protein in human brain development is still poorly understood, we studied its cellular and regional distribution by immunohistochemistry in the frontal lobe of 30 human fetal brains. Nogo-A was expressed in the following cortical zones: ependyma, ventricular zone, subventricular zone, intermediate zone, subplate, cortical plate, and marginal zone. The number of positive cells decreased significantly with increasing gestational age in the subplate and marginal zone. Using different antibodies, changes in isoform expression and dimerization states could be shown between various cortical zones. The results demonstrate a significant change in the expression of Nogo-A during the development of the human brain. The effects of its time- and region-specific regulation have to be further studied in detail.

Abstract

Nogo is a member of the reticulon family. Our understanding of the physiological functions of the Nogo-A protein has grown over the last few years, and this molecule is now recognized as one of the most important axonal regrowth inhibitors present in central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Nogo-A plays other important roles in nervous system development, epilepsy, vascular physiology, muscle pathology, stroke, inflammation, and CNS tumors. Since the exact role of Nogo-A protein in human brain development is still poorly understood, we studied its cellular and regional distribution by immunohistochemistry in the frontal lobe of 30 human fetal brains. Nogo-A was expressed in the following cortical zones: ependyma, ventricular zone, subventricular zone, intermediate zone, subplate, cortical plate, and marginal zone. The number of positive cells decreased significantly with increasing gestational age in the subplate and marginal zone. Using different antibodies, changes in isoform expression and dimerization states could be shown between various cortical zones. The results demonstrate a significant change in the expression of Nogo-A during the development of the human brain. The effects of its time- and region-specific regulation have to be further studied in detail.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:22 Feb 2013 13:53
Last Modified:16 Jun 2016 14:51
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0378-5866
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000343143
PubMed ID:23146900

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