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Quantitative sensory testing of intraoral open wounds


Ettlin, Dominik A; Hitz, T; Ramel, C; Meier, M L; Roos, Malgorzata; Gallo, L M; Svensson, P; Hämmerle, C H (2013). Quantitative sensory testing of intraoral open wounds. International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 42(3):401-405.

Abstract

Wound healing is an important aspect of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Positive sensory signs (allodynia, hyperalgesia) and negative sensory signs (hypoesthesia, hypoalgesia) may be encountered. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) has moved from bench to bedside for the detection, therapy selection and monitoring the recovery of individuals with sensory disturbances. Tracking somatosensory changes during normal and abnormal wound healing has not previously been reported. This report presents data obtained by a novel, automated, non-contact psychophysical method for assessment of wound sensitivity after standardized oral mucosal biopsy. By directing graded air puffs towards palatal biopsy wounds, thresholds for sensory detection, pain detection and pain tolerance were repeatedly assessed across 19 days, demonstrating high reliability. Participants recorded daily spontaneous and chewing-evoked maximum pains. Pain detection and tolerance thresholds increased linearly across time. Comparison between air puff evoked pain detection threshold and chewing-evoked pain demonstrated a strong correlation. Thus, for the first time, this study tracked the time course of somatosensory sensitivity of wounds induced by oral biopsies. The psychophysical data on wound healing obtained by this automated, contact-free stimulation method can be utilized as a surrogate marker for clinical pain improvements and standardized assessment of intraoral pain sensitivity, for example in oral mucositis.

Abstract

Wound healing is an important aspect of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Positive sensory signs (allodynia, hyperalgesia) and negative sensory signs (hypoesthesia, hypoalgesia) may be encountered. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) has moved from bench to bedside for the detection, therapy selection and monitoring the recovery of individuals with sensory disturbances. Tracking somatosensory changes during normal and abnormal wound healing has not previously been reported. This report presents data obtained by a novel, automated, non-contact psychophysical method for assessment of wound sensitivity after standardized oral mucosal biopsy. By directing graded air puffs towards palatal biopsy wounds, thresholds for sensory detection, pain detection and pain tolerance were repeatedly assessed across 19 days, demonstrating high reliability. Participants recorded daily spontaneous and chewing-evoked maximum pains. Pain detection and tolerance thresholds increased linearly across time. Comparison between air puff evoked pain detection threshold and chewing-evoked pain demonstrated a strong correlation. Thus, for the first time, this study tracked the time course of somatosensory sensitivity of wounds induced by oral biopsies. The psychophysical data on wound healing obtained by this automated, contact-free stimulation method can be utilized as a surrogate marker for clinical pain improvements and standardized assessment of intraoral pain sensitivity, for example in oral mucositis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Masticatory Disorders and Complete Dentures, Geriatric and Special Care Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:25 Feb 2013 12:41
Last Modified:07 Oct 2017 07:49
Publisher:Churchill Livingstone
ISSN:0901-5027
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijom.2012.11.010
PubMed ID:23238026

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