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Distinct functional properties of primary and posteromedial visual area of mouse neocortex


Roth, Morgane M; Helmchen, Fritjof; Kampa, Björn M (2012). Distinct functional properties of primary and posteromedial visual area of mouse neocortex. Journal of Neuroscience, 32(28):9716-9726.

Abstract

Visual input provides important landmarks for navigating in the environment, information that in mammals is processed by specialized areas in the visual cortex. In rodents, the posteromedial area (PM) mediates visual information between primary visual cortex (V1) and the retrosplenial cortex, which further projects to the hippocampus. To understand the functional role of area PM requires a detailed analysis of its spatial frequency (SF) and temporal frequency (TF) tuning. Here, we applied two-photon calcium imaging to map neuronal tuning for orientation, direction, SF and TF, and speed in response to drifting gratings in V1 and PM of anesthetized mice. The distributions of orientation and direction tuning were similar in V1 and PM. Notably, in both areas we found a preference for cardinal compared to oblique orientations. The overrepresentation of cardinal tuned neurons was particularly strong in PM showing narrow tuning bandwidths for horizontal and vertical orientations. A detailed analysis of SF and TF tuning revealed a broad range of highly tuned neurons in V1. On the contrary, PM contained one subpopulation of neurons with high spatial acuity and a second subpopulation broadly tuned for low SFs. Furthermore, ∼20% of the responding neurons in V1 and only 12% in PM were tuned to the speed of drifting gratings with PM preferring slower drift rates compared to V1. Together, PM is tuned for cardinal orientations, high SFs, and low speed and is further located between V1 and the retrosplenial cortex consistent with a role in processing natural scenes during spatial navigation.

Abstract

Visual input provides important landmarks for navigating in the environment, information that in mammals is processed by specialized areas in the visual cortex. In rodents, the posteromedial area (PM) mediates visual information between primary visual cortex (V1) and the retrosplenial cortex, which further projects to the hippocampus. To understand the functional role of area PM requires a detailed analysis of its spatial frequency (SF) and temporal frequency (TF) tuning. Here, we applied two-photon calcium imaging to map neuronal tuning for orientation, direction, SF and TF, and speed in response to drifting gratings in V1 and PM of anesthetized mice. The distributions of orientation and direction tuning were similar in V1 and PM. Notably, in both areas we found a preference for cardinal compared to oblique orientations. The overrepresentation of cardinal tuned neurons was particularly strong in PM showing narrow tuning bandwidths for horizontal and vertical orientations. A detailed analysis of SF and TF tuning revealed a broad range of highly tuned neurons in V1. On the contrary, PM contained one subpopulation of neurons with high spatial acuity and a second subpopulation broadly tuned for low SFs. Furthermore, ∼20% of the responding neurons in V1 and only 12% in PM were tuned to the speed of drifting gratings with PM preferring slower drift rates compared to V1. Together, PM is tuned for cardinal orientations, high SFs, and low speed and is further located between V1 and the retrosplenial cortex consistent with a role in processing natural scenes during spatial navigation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Brain Research Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:21 Feb 2013 14:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:33
Publisher:Society for Neuroscience
ISSN:0270-6474
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0110-12.2012
PubMed ID:22787057

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