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A preliminary study on the effect of manuka honey on second-intention healing of contaminated wounds on the distal aspect of the forelimbs of horses


Bischofberger, Andrea S; Dart, Christina; Perkins, N; Dart, Andrew J (2011). A preliminary study on the effect of manuka honey on second-intention healing of contaminated wounds on the distal aspect of the forelimbs of horses. Veterinary Surgery, 40(7):898-902.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of manuka honey on second-intention healing of contaminated, full-thickness skin wounds in horses.
STUDY DESIGN: Experimental.
ANIMALS: Adult Standardbred horses (n = 8).
METHODS: One wound was created on the dorsomedial aspect of the third metacarpus in both forelimbs, contaminated with feces, and bandaged for 24 hours. Bandages were removed and wounds rinsed with isotonic saline solution. Wounds on 1 limb had manuka honey applied daily (n = 8) whereas wounds on the contralateral limb received no treatment (n = 8). Bandages were replaced and changed daily for 12 days, after which treatment stopped, bandages were removed, leaving wounds open to heal. Wound area was measured 24 hours after wound creation (day 1), then weekly for 8 weeks. Overall time for healing was recorded. Wound area and rate of healing of treated and control wounds were compared statistically.
RESULTS: Treatment with manuka honey decreased wound retraction and treated wounds remained significantly smaller than control wounds until day 42; however, there was no difference in overall healing time between treatment and control wounds.
CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with manuka honey reduced wound area by reducing retraction but did not affect overall healing time of full-thickness distal limb wounds using this wound-healing model.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of manuka honey on second-intention healing of contaminated, full-thickness skin wounds in horses.
STUDY DESIGN: Experimental.
ANIMALS: Adult Standardbred horses (n = 8).
METHODS: One wound was created on the dorsomedial aspect of the third metacarpus in both forelimbs, contaminated with feces, and bandaged for 24 hours. Bandages were removed and wounds rinsed with isotonic saline solution. Wounds on 1 limb had manuka honey applied daily (n = 8) whereas wounds on the contralateral limb received no treatment (n = 8). Bandages were replaced and changed daily for 12 days, after which treatment stopped, bandages were removed, leaving wounds open to heal. Wound area was measured 24 hours after wound creation (day 1), then weekly for 8 weeks. Overall time for healing was recorded. Wound area and rate of healing of treated and control wounds were compared statistically.
RESULTS: Treatment with manuka honey decreased wound retraction and treated wounds remained significantly smaller than control wounds until day 42; however, there was no difference in overall healing time between treatment and control wounds.
CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with manuka honey reduced wound area by reducing retraction but did not affect overall healing time of full-thickness distal limb wounds using this wound-healing model.

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18 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:22 Feb 2013 09:23
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 20:06
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0161-3499
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-950X.2011.00886.x
PubMed ID:22380675

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