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Respiratory motion correction in oncologic PET using T1-Weighted MR imaging on a simultaneous whole-body PET/MR system


Würslin, Christian; Schmidt, Holger; Martirosian, Petros; Brendle, Cornelia; Boss, Andreas; Schwenzer, Nina F; Stegger, Lars (2013). Respiratory motion correction in oncologic PET using T1-Weighted MR imaging on a simultaneous whole-body PET/MR system. Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 54(3):464-471.

Abstract

Hybrid PET/MR combines the exceptional molecular sensitivity of PET with the high resolution and versatility of MR imaging. Simultaneous data acquisition additionally promises the use of MR to enhance the quality of PET images, for example, by respiratory motion correction. This advantage is especially relevant in thoracic and abdominal areas to improve the visibility of small lesions with low radiotracer uptake and to enhance uptake quantification. In this work, the applicability and performance of an MR-based method of respiratory motion correction for PET tumor imaging was evaluated in phantom and patient studies. METHODS: PET list-mode data from a motion phantom with (22)Na point sources and 5 patients with tumor manifestations in the thorax and upper abdomen were acquired on a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR system. During the first 3 min of a 5-min PET scan, the respiration-induced tissue deformation in the PET field of view was recorded using a sagittal 2-dimensional multislice gradient echo MR sequence. MR navigator data to measure the location of the diaphragm were acquired throughout the PET scan. Respiration-gated PET data were coregistered using the MR-derived motion fields to obtain a single motion-corrected PET dataset. The effect of motion correction on tumor visibility, delineation, and radiotracer uptake quantification was analyzed with respect to uncorrected and gated images. RESULTS: Image quality in terms of lesion delineation and uptake quantification was significantly improved compared with uncorrected images for both phantom and patient data. In patients, in head-feet line profiles of 14 manifestations, the slope became steeper by 66.7% (P = 0.001) and full width at half maximum was reduced by 20.6% (P = 0.001). The mean increase in maximum standardized uptake value, lesion-to-background ratio (contrast), and signal-to-noise ratio was 28.1% (P = 0.001), 24.7% (P = 0.001), and 27.3% (P = 0.003), respectively. Lesion volume was reduced by an average of 26.5% (P = 0.002). As opposed to the gated images, no increase in background noise was observed. However, motion correction performed worse than gating in terms of contrast (-11.3%, P = 0.002), maximum standardized uptake value (-10.7%, P = 0.003), and slope steepness (-19.3%, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: The proposed method for MR-based respiratory motion correction of PET data proved feasible and effective. The short examination time and convenience (no additional equipment required) of the method allow for easy integration into clinical routine imaging. Performance compared with gating procedures can be further improved using list-mode-based motion correction.

Abstract

Hybrid PET/MR combines the exceptional molecular sensitivity of PET with the high resolution and versatility of MR imaging. Simultaneous data acquisition additionally promises the use of MR to enhance the quality of PET images, for example, by respiratory motion correction. This advantage is especially relevant in thoracic and abdominal areas to improve the visibility of small lesions with low radiotracer uptake and to enhance uptake quantification. In this work, the applicability and performance of an MR-based method of respiratory motion correction for PET tumor imaging was evaluated in phantom and patient studies. METHODS: PET list-mode data from a motion phantom with (22)Na point sources and 5 patients with tumor manifestations in the thorax and upper abdomen were acquired on a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR system. During the first 3 min of a 5-min PET scan, the respiration-induced tissue deformation in the PET field of view was recorded using a sagittal 2-dimensional multislice gradient echo MR sequence. MR navigator data to measure the location of the diaphragm were acquired throughout the PET scan. Respiration-gated PET data were coregistered using the MR-derived motion fields to obtain a single motion-corrected PET dataset. The effect of motion correction on tumor visibility, delineation, and radiotracer uptake quantification was analyzed with respect to uncorrected and gated images. RESULTS: Image quality in terms of lesion delineation and uptake quantification was significantly improved compared with uncorrected images for both phantom and patient data. In patients, in head-feet line profiles of 14 manifestations, the slope became steeper by 66.7% (P = 0.001) and full width at half maximum was reduced by 20.6% (P = 0.001). The mean increase in maximum standardized uptake value, lesion-to-background ratio (contrast), and signal-to-noise ratio was 28.1% (P = 0.001), 24.7% (P = 0.001), and 27.3% (P = 0.003), respectively. Lesion volume was reduced by an average of 26.5% (P = 0.002). As opposed to the gated images, no increase in background noise was observed. However, motion correction performed worse than gating in terms of contrast (-11.3%, P = 0.002), maximum standardized uptake value (-10.7%, P = 0.003), and slope steepness (-19.3%, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: The proposed method for MR-based respiratory motion correction of PET data proved feasible and effective. The short examination time and convenience (no additional equipment required) of the method allow for easy integration into clinical routine imaging. Performance compared with gating procedures can be further improved using list-mode-based motion correction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:21 Mar 2013 15:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:35
Publisher:Society of Nuclear Medicine
ISSN:0161-5505
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2967/jnumed.112.105296
PubMed ID:23287577

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