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Effect of low direct current on anaerobic multispecies biofilm adhering to a titanium implant surface


Sahrmann, Philipp; Zehnder, Matthias; Mohn, Dirk; Meier, André; Imfeld, Thomas; Thurnheer, Thomas (2014). Effect of low direct current on anaerobic multispecies biofilm adhering to a titanium implant surface. Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, 16(4):552-556.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Peri-implantitis is caused by biofilm adhering to the implant. It has been shown that bactericidal electrolysis products are generated when a low direct current is applied to a titanium implant used as the anode. The hypothesis of this study was that low-current electrolysis would eradicate viable bacteria in a simulated subgingival multispecies biofilm adhering to a titanium implant surface. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Biofilms consisting of eight anaerobic species were grown on pellicle-coated titanium discs with sand-blasted, acid-etched, large-grit (SLA; Straumann, Basel, Switzerland) surface. After 40.5 hours of growth, discs were treated with 10 mA for 10 minutes in an electrolytical setup with physiological saline and gelatin. RESULTS: Low direct current at discs used as the cathode caused a reduction of three to four orders of magnitude in viable counts, while no viable bacteria were recovered from anode discs (Mann-Whitney U-test, p < .01). Confocal laser scanning microscopy in combination with a live/dead stain showed biofilm detachment at the cathode and reduced viability at the anode. CONCLUSION: Electrochemical treatment of diseased implants appears to be promising and well worth investigating further.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Peri-implantitis is caused by biofilm adhering to the implant. It has been shown that bactericidal electrolysis products are generated when a low direct current is applied to a titanium implant used as the anode. The hypothesis of this study was that low-current electrolysis would eradicate viable bacteria in a simulated subgingival multispecies biofilm adhering to a titanium implant surface. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Biofilms consisting of eight anaerobic species were grown on pellicle-coated titanium discs with sand-blasted, acid-etched, large-grit (SLA; Straumann, Basel, Switzerland) surface. After 40.5 hours of growth, discs were treated with 10 mA for 10 minutes in an electrolytical setup with physiological saline and gelatin. RESULTS: Low direct current at discs used as the cathode caused a reduction of three to four orders of magnitude in viable counts, while no viable bacteria were recovered from anode discs (Mann-Whitney U-test, p < .01). Confocal laser scanning microscopy in combination with a live/dead stain showed biofilm detachment at the cathode and reduced viability at the anode. CONCLUSION: Electrochemical treatment of diseased implants appears to be promising and well worth investigating further.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Institute of Oral Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2014
Deposited On:04 Mar 2013 15:49
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 20:13
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1523-0899
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/cid.12018
PubMed ID:23167678

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