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HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension. A case control study. Swiss HIV Cohort Study


Opravil, M; Pechère, M; Speich, R; Joller-Jemelka, H I; Jenni, R; Russi, E W; Hirschel, B; Lüthy, R (1997). HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension. A case control study. Swiss HIV Cohort Study. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 155(3):990-995.

Abstract

To assess the clinical and echocardiographic time course, prognosis, and possible etiology of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), we prospectively followed all 19 patients in whom PPH was diagnosed in our centers. Women (12 cases) and injecting drug use (16 cases) predominated; the median CD4 lymphocytes count was 83/microliter (range, 1 to 740). Matched control subjects without PPH were identified within the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. Frozen serum samples of both groups were then reanalyzed for autoimmune parameters, neopterin, beta-2-microglobulin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone. The median follow up of the patients was 1.3 yr. Follow-up Doppler echocardiography was available in 13 patients. The RVSP-RAP pressure gradient decreased by 3.2 mm Hg for those six patients who received antiretroviral treatment but increased by 19.0 mm Hg for untreated patients (p = 0.026). PPH was the cause of eight of 17 deaths. The probability of surviving was significantly decreased in patients with PPH in comparison with the control subjects; the median survival was 1.3 versus 2.6 yr (p < 0.05). Patients with PPH had significantly higher anticardiolipin IgM, anti SS-B, and neopterin, but all other laboratory values did not differ between cases and control subjects. In conclusion, HIV-associated PPH contributed significantly to mortality. Antiretroviral treatment may exert a beneficial effect on the pressure gradient. A possible role of an autoimmune phenomenon in the pathogenesis could not be substantiated.

Abstract

To assess the clinical and echocardiographic time course, prognosis, and possible etiology of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), we prospectively followed all 19 patients in whom PPH was diagnosed in our centers. Women (12 cases) and injecting drug use (16 cases) predominated; the median CD4 lymphocytes count was 83/microliter (range, 1 to 740). Matched control subjects without PPH were identified within the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. Frozen serum samples of both groups were then reanalyzed for autoimmune parameters, neopterin, beta-2-microglobulin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone. The median follow up of the patients was 1.3 yr. Follow-up Doppler echocardiography was available in 13 patients. The RVSP-RAP pressure gradient decreased by 3.2 mm Hg for those six patients who received antiretroviral treatment but increased by 19.0 mm Hg for untreated patients (p = 0.026). PPH was the cause of eight of 17 deaths. The probability of surviving was significantly decreased in patients with PPH in comparison with the control subjects; the median survival was 1.3 versus 2.6 yr (p < 0.05). Patients with PPH had significantly higher anticardiolipin IgM, anti SS-B, and neopterin, but all other laboratory values did not differ between cases and control subjects. In conclusion, HIV-associated PPH contributed significantly to mortality. Antiretroviral treatment may exert a beneficial effect on the pressure gradient. A possible role of an autoimmune phenomenon in the pathogenesis could not be substantiated.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1997
Deposited On:17 Apr 2013 11:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:36
Publisher:American Thoracic Society
ISSN:1073-449X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm.155.3.9117037
PubMed ID:9117037

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