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Shiga toxin subtypes associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from red deer, roe deer, chamois and ibex


Hofer, E; Cernela, N; Stephan, R (2012). Shiga toxin subtypes associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from red deer, roe deer, chamois and ibex. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease , 9(9):792-795.

Abstract

A total of 52 Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, isolated from fecal samples of six ibex, 12 chamois, 15 roe deer, and 19 red deer were further characterized by subtyping the stx genes, examining strains for the top nine serogroups and testing for the presence of eae and ehxA. Eleven of the 52 strains belonged to one of the top nine STEC O groups (O26, O45, O91, O103, O111, O113, O121, O145, and O157). Eight STEC strains were of serogroup O145, two strains of serogroup O113, and one strain of serogroup O157. None of the strains harbored stx2a, stx2e, or stx2f. Stx2b (24 strains) and stx1c (21 strains) were the most frequently detected stx subtypes, occurring alone or in combination with another stx subtype. Eight strains harbored stx2g, five strains stx2d, three strains stx1a, two strains stx2c, and one strain stx1d. Stx2g and stx1d were detected in strains not harboring any other stx subtype. The eae and ehxA genes were detected in two and 24 STEC strains, respectively. Considering both, the serogroups and the virulence factors, the majority of the STEC strains isolated from red deer, roe deer, chamois, and ibex do not show the typical patterns of highly pathogenic STEC strains. To assess the potential pathogenicity of STEC for humans, strain isolation and characterization is therefore of central importance.

Abstract

A total of 52 Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, isolated from fecal samples of six ibex, 12 chamois, 15 roe deer, and 19 red deer were further characterized by subtyping the stx genes, examining strains for the top nine serogroups and testing for the presence of eae and ehxA. Eleven of the 52 strains belonged to one of the top nine STEC O groups (O26, O45, O91, O103, O111, O113, O121, O145, and O157). Eight STEC strains were of serogroup O145, two strains of serogroup O113, and one strain of serogroup O157. None of the strains harbored stx2a, stx2e, or stx2f. Stx2b (24 strains) and stx1c (21 strains) were the most frequently detected stx subtypes, occurring alone or in combination with another stx subtype. Eight strains harbored stx2g, five strains stx2d, three strains stx1a, two strains stx2c, and one strain stx1d. Stx2g and stx1d were detected in strains not harboring any other stx subtype. The eae and ehxA genes were detected in two and 24 STEC strains, respectively. Considering both, the serogroups and the virulence factors, the majority of the STEC strains isolated from red deer, roe deer, chamois, and ibex do not show the typical patterns of highly pathogenic STEC strains. To assess the potential pathogenicity of STEC for humans, strain isolation and characterization is therefore of central importance.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:12 Mar 2013 08:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:37
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
Additional Information:This is a copy of an article published in Foodborne Pathogens and Disease © 2012 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; Foodborne Pathogens and Disease is available online at: http://online.liebertpub.com.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2012.1156

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