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Spices and herbs as source of salmonella-related foodborne diseases


Zweifel, C; Stephan, R (2012). Spices and herbs as source of salmonella-related foodborne diseases. Food Research International, 45(2):765-769.

Abstract

Salmonella is a leading cause of foodborne diseases and the role of ready-to-eat products including plant-derived food is increasingly recognized. The present survey reviewed recent literature on Salmonella-related outbreaks caused by spices and herbs and on the occurrence of Salmonella in these food matrices. Spices and herbs contaminated with Salmonella were responsible for a variety of foodborne outbreaks in Europe and North America. Identified serovars did often not belong to those predominating in human illness. Moreover, in different survey studies, Salmonella belonging to a broad diversity of serovars were found in a variety of spices and herbs. The proportion of Salmonella-positive samples ranged from 0% to 8.4%, albeit detection rates were rather low in most studies. Higher prevalence rates were often obtained with regard to a specific spice or herb type. Due to high desiccation tolerance, Salmonella can survive for an extended period of time in spices and dried herbs. Thus, by the use of untreated spices and herbs for production of foods not subjected to a heat treatment or for seasoning of ready-to-eat products, Salmonella might be introduced and in this way might pose a threat to consumers.

Abstract

Salmonella is a leading cause of foodborne diseases and the role of ready-to-eat products including plant-derived food is increasingly recognized. The present survey reviewed recent literature on Salmonella-related outbreaks caused by spices and herbs and on the occurrence of Salmonella in these food matrices. Spices and herbs contaminated with Salmonella were responsible for a variety of foodborne outbreaks in Europe and North America. Identified serovars did often not belong to those predominating in human illness. Moreover, in different survey studies, Salmonella belonging to a broad diversity of serovars were found in a variety of spices and herbs. The proportion of Salmonella-positive samples ranged from 0% to 8.4%, albeit detection rates were rather low in most studies. Higher prevalence rates were often obtained with regard to a specific spice or herb type. Due to high desiccation tolerance, Salmonella can survive for an extended period of time in spices and dried herbs. Thus, by the use of untreated spices and herbs for production of foods not subjected to a heat treatment or for seasoning of ready-to-eat products, Salmonella might be introduced and in this way might pose a threat to consumers.

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35 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:11 Mar 2013 09:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:37
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2011.02.024

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