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Effects of bioactive glass S53P4 or beta-tricalcium phosphate and bone morphogenetic protein-2 and bone morphogenetic protein-7 on osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells


Waselau, Martin; Patrikoski, Mimmi; Juntunen, Miia; Kujala, Kasperi; Kääriäinen, Minna; Kuokkanen, Hannu; Sándor, George K; Vapaavuori, Outi; Suuronen, Riitta; Mannerström, Bettina; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Miettinen, Susanna (2012). Effects of bioactive glass S53P4 or beta-tricalcium phosphate and bone morphogenetic protein-2 and bone morphogenetic protein-7 on osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells. Journal of Tissue Engineering, 3(1):2041731412467789.

Abstract

The effects of bioactive glass S53P4 or beta-tricalcium phosphate; and bone morphogenetic proteins bone morphogenetic protein-2, bone morphogenetic protein-7, or bone morphogenetic protein-2 + 7 on osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells were compared in control medium, osteogenic medium, and bone morphogenetic protein-supplemented osteogenic medium to assess suitability for bone tissue engineering. Cell amount was evaluated with qDNA measurements; osteogenic differentiation using marker gene expression, alkaline phosphate activity, and angiogenic potential was measured by vascular endothelial growth factor expression. As compared to beta-tricalcium phosphate, cell amount was significantly greater for bioactive glass in control medium after 7 days and in osteogenic medium after 14 days, and alkaline phosphate activity was always significantly greater for bioactive glass in control medium. However, alkaline phosphate activity increased for beta-tricalcium phosphate and decreased for bioactive glass granules in osteogenic medium. For both biomaterials, bone morphogenetic protein supplementation decreased cell amount and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells, and vascular endothelial growth factor expressions correlated with cell amounts. Effects of culture medium on human adipose stem cells are biomaterial dependent; bioactive glass in control medium enhanced osteogenic differentiation most effectively.

Abstract

The effects of bioactive glass S53P4 or beta-tricalcium phosphate; and bone morphogenetic proteins bone morphogenetic protein-2, bone morphogenetic protein-7, or bone morphogenetic protein-2 + 7 on osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells were compared in control medium, osteogenic medium, and bone morphogenetic protein-supplemented osteogenic medium to assess suitability for bone tissue engineering. Cell amount was evaluated with qDNA measurements; osteogenic differentiation using marker gene expression, alkaline phosphate activity, and angiogenic potential was measured by vascular endothelial growth factor expression. As compared to beta-tricalcium phosphate, cell amount was significantly greater for bioactive glass in control medium after 7 days and in osteogenic medium after 14 days, and alkaline phosphate activity was always significantly greater for bioactive glass in control medium. However, alkaline phosphate activity increased for beta-tricalcium phosphate and decreased for bioactive glass granules in osteogenic medium. For both biomaterials, bone morphogenetic protein supplementation decreased cell amount and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells, and vascular endothelial growth factor expressions correlated with cell amounts. Effects of culture medium on human adipose stem cells are biomaterial dependent; bioactive glass in control medium enhanced osteogenic differentiation most effectively.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:06 Mar 2013 10:56
Last Modified:05 Aug 2017 07:41
Publisher:SAGE-Hindawi Access to Research
ISSN:2041-7314
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/2041731412467789
PubMed ID:23316275

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