Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Thermal degradation of rye and maize straw: Lipid pattern changes as a function of temperature


Wiesenberg, Guido L B; Lehndorff, E; Schwark, L (2009). Thermal degradation of rye and maize straw: Lipid pattern changes as a function of temperature. Organic Geochemistry, 40(2):167-174.

Abstract

Future climatic conditions may coincide with an increased potential for wildfires in grassland and forest ecosystems, whereby charred biomass would be incorporated into soils. Molecular changes in biomass upon charring have been frequently analysed with a focus on black carbon. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, known to be liberated during incomplete combustion of biomass have been preferentially analysed in soot particles, whereas determinations of these compounds in charred biomass residues are scarce. We discuss the influence of increasing charring temperature on the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon composition of crop grass combustion residues. Straw from rye, representing C3 grasses and maize, representing C4 grasses, was charred in the presence of limited oxygen at 300, 400 and 500 °C. Typical n-alkane distribution patterns with a strong predominance of long chain odd-numbered n-alkanes maximising at C31 were observed in raw straw. Upon combustion at 300 °C aliphatic hydrocarbons in char were dominated by sterenes, whereas at 400 °C sterenes disappeared and medium chain length n-alkanes, maximising around n-C20, with a balanced odd/even distribution were present. At a charring temperature of 500 °C n-alkane chain length shifted to short chain homologues, maximising at C18 with a pronounced predominance of even homologues. Even numbered, short chain n-alkanes in soils may thus serve as a marker for residues of charred biomass. Aromatic hydrocarbons indicate an onset of aromatization of biomass already at 300 °C, followed by severe aromatization upon incomplete combustion at 400–500 °C. The diagnostic composition of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons from charred biomass affords potential for identifying residues from burned vegetation in recent and fossil soils and sediments.

Abstract

Future climatic conditions may coincide with an increased potential for wildfires in grassland and forest ecosystems, whereby charred biomass would be incorporated into soils. Molecular changes in biomass upon charring have been frequently analysed with a focus on black carbon. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, known to be liberated during incomplete combustion of biomass have been preferentially analysed in soot particles, whereas determinations of these compounds in charred biomass residues are scarce. We discuss the influence of increasing charring temperature on the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon composition of crop grass combustion residues. Straw from rye, representing C3 grasses and maize, representing C4 grasses, was charred in the presence of limited oxygen at 300, 400 and 500 °C. Typical n-alkane distribution patterns with a strong predominance of long chain odd-numbered n-alkanes maximising at C31 were observed in raw straw. Upon combustion at 300 °C aliphatic hydrocarbons in char were dominated by sterenes, whereas at 400 °C sterenes disappeared and medium chain length n-alkanes, maximising around n-C20, with a balanced odd/even distribution were present. At a charring temperature of 500 °C n-alkane chain length shifted to short chain homologues, maximising at C18 with a pronounced predominance of even homologues. Even numbered, short chain n-alkanes in soils may thus serve as a marker for residues of charred biomass. Aromatic hydrocarbons indicate an onset of aromatization of biomass already at 300 °C, followed by severe aromatization upon incomplete combustion at 400–500 °C. The diagnostic composition of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons from charred biomass affords potential for identifying residues from burned vegetation in recent and fossil soils and sediments.

Statistics

Citations

41 citations in Web of Science®
42 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 14 Mar 2013
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:14 Mar 2013 10:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0146-6380
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.orggeochem.2008.11.004

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 582kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations