Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

From 'following the push of nature' to 'restoring one's proper sex'--cortisone and sex at Johns Hopkins's Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic


Eder, Sandra (2012). From 'following the push of nature' to 'restoring one's proper sex'--cortisone and sex at Johns Hopkins's Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic. Endeavour, 36(2):69-76.

Abstract

In 1955, a paradigm shift in the conception of sex is said to have taken place, when psychologist John Money at Johns Hopkins's Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic argued that 'hermaphroditic' children could be assigned a sex contradictory to their biological sex. Rather than being born male or female, he claimed, these children learned to be boys or girls. Money was subsequently credited the invention of the term gender role. However, Money only confirmed a practice that was established at the clinic several years before his intervention. The clinic's director Lawson Wilkins (1894-1963) had already recommended that certain children, virilized by congenital adrenal hyperplasia, should be raised in the male sex, even though they were by all medical standards of the time female. What mattered for him was assigning the sex that seemed 'better' for these children. What constituted the 'better sex' was contingent on the child's psyche and habitus, social expectations, and on the range of medical and surgical interventions available at the time.

Abstract

In 1955, a paradigm shift in the conception of sex is said to have taken place, when psychologist John Money at Johns Hopkins's Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic argued that 'hermaphroditic' children could be assigned a sex contradictory to their biological sex. Rather than being born male or female, he claimed, these children learned to be boys or girls. Money was subsequently credited the invention of the term gender role. However, Money only confirmed a practice that was established at the clinic several years before his intervention. The clinic's director Lawson Wilkins (1894-1963) had already recommended that certain children, virilized by congenital adrenal hyperplasia, should be raised in the male sex, even though they were by all medical standards of the time female. What mattered for him was assigning the sex that seemed 'better' for these children. What constituted the 'better sex' was contingent on the child's psyche and habitus, social expectations, and on the range of medical and surgical interventions available at the time.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:12 Mar 2013 10:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0160-9327
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.endeavour.2011.11.003
PubMed ID:22341650

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher