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Spectroradiometric measurements of tree species in the Caspian forests of Iran


Abbasi, M; Schaepman, Michael E; Darvishsefat, A A; Bartholomeus, H M; Marvi Mohajer, M R; Sobhani, H (2008). Spectroradiometric measurements of tree species in the Caspian forests of Iran. In: XXIth ISPRS Congress, Beijing, 3 July 2008 - 11 July 2008, 291-298.

Abstract

Forest type maps play a significant role in sustainable forest management. For many years aerial photos and satellite data were a primary data source supporting forest type mapping. Recent developments in remote sensing provide opportunities to further enhance forest type maps by introducing variations of spectral, biochemical and biophysical properties at various scales. A structural sampling and collection of the above variables will support an improved interfacing between spatially continuous data, forest type maps and finally will support forward and inverse modeling of advanced forest biochemical, -structural, and other relevant variables.
The main objective of this study is to acquire, process and analyze spectral signatures of main forest tree species of the Caspian forest (namely Fagus orientalis, Quercus castaneifolia, Carpinus betulus, Alnus subcordata, and Parrotia persica) located in the Research Forest owned by the University of Tehran on the Northern slopes of the Elburz mountains, Iran. We have sampled 102 spectra each of the afore mentioned tree species using leaf ‘pile’ reflectance and branch pile reflectance. We build a comprehensive database of leaf optical properties, and other measures such as branch and twig reflectance. Field spectroradiometric measurements (350-2500nm) were carried out in the course of summer 2007. Spectral measurements were acquired in altitude gradients between 400-2100m (low, mid and high elevation) of the Elburz mountains. All spectral signatures after preprocessing were analyzed physically and statistically. We select a set of vegetation indices related to optical properties of the leaves and exploit changes of vegetation reflectance signature dependent on illumination conditions (shaded vs. non-shaded leaves) and chlorophyll content. We conclude that the Vogelmann index (R740/R720) is more sensitive to chlorophyll content in comparison with the other indices. It shows that hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) is significantly different in spectral signatures compared to beech (Fagus orientalis), oak, (Quercus castaneifolia) and alder (Alnus subcordata) as well as ironwood (Parrotia persica) with alder and oak being statistically different

Abstract

Forest type maps play a significant role in sustainable forest management. For many years aerial photos and satellite data were a primary data source supporting forest type mapping. Recent developments in remote sensing provide opportunities to further enhance forest type maps by introducing variations of spectral, biochemical and biophysical properties at various scales. A structural sampling and collection of the above variables will support an improved interfacing between spatially continuous data, forest type maps and finally will support forward and inverse modeling of advanced forest biochemical, -structural, and other relevant variables.
The main objective of this study is to acquire, process and analyze spectral signatures of main forest tree species of the Caspian forest (namely Fagus orientalis, Quercus castaneifolia, Carpinus betulus, Alnus subcordata, and Parrotia persica) located in the Research Forest owned by the University of Tehran on the Northern slopes of the Elburz mountains, Iran. We have sampled 102 spectra each of the afore mentioned tree species using leaf ‘pile’ reflectance and branch pile reflectance. We build a comprehensive database of leaf optical properties, and other measures such as branch and twig reflectance. Field spectroradiometric measurements (350-2500nm) were carried out in the course of summer 2007. Spectral measurements were acquired in altitude gradients between 400-2100m (low, mid and high elevation) of the Elburz mountains. All spectral signatures after preprocessing were analyzed physically and statistically. We select a set of vegetation indices related to optical properties of the leaves and exploit changes of vegetation reflectance signature dependent on illumination conditions (shaded vs. non-shaded leaves) and chlorophyll content. We conclude that the Vogelmann index (R740/R720) is more sensitive to chlorophyll content in comparison with the other indices. It shows that hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) is significantly different in spectral signatures compared to beech (Fagus orientalis), oak, (Quercus castaneifolia) and alder (Alnus subcordata) as well as ironwood (Parrotia persica) with alder and oak being statistically different

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Event End Date:11 July 2008
Deposited On:20 Mar 2013 16:42
Last Modified:14 Aug 2017 11:32
Publisher:Intl. Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences (ISPRS)
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.isprs.org/proceedings/XXXVII/congress/7_pdf/3_WG-VII-3/14.pdf
Related URLs:http://www.isprs.org/publications/archives.aspx (Publisher)

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