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Long-term neurodevelopmental outcome with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Perez, Anna; Ritter, Susanne; Brotschi, Barbara; Werner, Helen; Caflisch, Jon; Martin, Ernst; Latal, Beatrice (2013). Long-term neurodevelopmental outcome with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Journal of Pediatrics, 163(2):454-459.e1.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome for children after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) without major disability, and to examine neonatal injury patterns detected on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to later deficits. STUDY DESIGN: Prospectively enrolled children with HIE and neonatal cerebral MRI data (n = 68) were examined at a mean age of 11.2 years (range, 8.2-15.7 years). Eleven children had a major disability (ie, cerebral palsy or mental retardation). Brain injury was scored according to the region and extent of injury. RESULTS: Children without major disability (n = 57) had lower full-scale and performance IQ scores compared with norms (P = .02 and .01, respectively), and the proportion of children with an IQ <85 was higher than expected (P = .04). Motor performance on the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment was affected in the pure motor, adaptive fine motor, and gross motor domains, as well as in the movement quality domain (all P < .001). Watershed injury pattern on neonatal MRI correlated with full-scale and verbal IQ scores (P = .006 and <.001, respectively), but neonatal MRI pattern did not correlate with motor performance in children without major disability. CONCLUSION: Children who sustained neonatal HIE without major disability are at increased risk for long-term intellectual, verbal, and motor deficits. The severity of watershed injury is correlated with later intellectual performance. Long-term follow-up examinations are necessary for early detection of neurodevelopmental impairment and early initiation of adequate therapies.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome for children after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) without major disability, and to examine neonatal injury patterns detected on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to later deficits. STUDY DESIGN: Prospectively enrolled children with HIE and neonatal cerebral MRI data (n = 68) were examined at a mean age of 11.2 years (range, 8.2-15.7 years). Eleven children had a major disability (ie, cerebral palsy or mental retardation). Brain injury was scored according to the region and extent of injury. RESULTS: Children without major disability (n = 57) had lower full-scale and performance IQ scores compared with norms (P = .02 and .01, respectively), and the proportion of children with an IQ <85 was higher than expected (P = .04). Motor performance on the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment was affected in the pure motor, adaptive fine motor, and gross motor domains, as well as in the movement quality domain (all P < .001). Watershed injury pattern on neonatal MRI correlated with full-scale and verbal IQ scores (P = .006 and <.001, respectively), but neonatal MRI pattern did not correlate with motor performance in children without major disability. CONCLUSION: Children who sustained neonatal HIE without major disability are at increased risk for long-term intellectual, verbal, and motor deficits. The severity of watershed injury is correlated with later intellectual performance. Long-term follow-up examinations are necessary for early detection of neurodevelopmental impairment and early initiation of adequate therapies.

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23 citations in Web of Science®
26 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:14 May 2013 14:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:44
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-3476
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.02.003
PubMed ID:23498155

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