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Relationships among higher-order strengths factors, subjective well-being, and general self-efficacy – The case of Israeli adolescents


Weber, Marco; Ruch, Willibald; Littman-Ovadia, Hadassah; Lavy, Shiri; Gai, Or (2013). Relationships among higher-order strengths factors, subjective well-being, and general self-efficacy – The case of Israeli adolescents. Personality and Individual Differences, 55(3):322-327.

Abstract

We investigated relationships among five higher-order strengths factors, subjective well-being, and general
self-efficacy in participants that live under challenging conditions. Therefore, a sample of 396 Israeli
adolescents (aged 13–18 years) completed the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth, the Satisfaction
With Life Scale, the Affect Balance Scale, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale. An orthogonally
rotated principal component analysis of the 24 character strengths yielded five strengths factors that
explained 32% of the variance in life satisfaction, with the transcendence strengths factor as the most substantial
predictor. The strongest predictors of positive affect were the transcendence and leadership
strengths factors; the best predictors of negative affect were the transcendence and temperance
strengths factors; and the strongest predictor of affect balance was the transcendence strengths factor.
The five strengths factors explained 46% of the variance in general self-efficacy, with the leadership
strengths factor as the most substantial predictor. Further analysis indicated that general self-efficacy
mediated the relationship between leadership strengths and global life satisfaction. The results suggest
that different strengths factors are relevant for different positive experiences (e.g., life satisfaction,
self-efficacy beliefs). The findings shed light on the contribution of specific character strengths as a meaningful
resource under stressful conditions.

Abstract

We investigated relationships among five higher-order strengths factors, subjective well-being, and general
self-efficacy in participants that live under challenging conditions. Therefore, a sample of 396 Israeli
adolescents (aged 13–18 years) completed the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth, the Satisfaction
With Life Scale, the Affect Balance Scale, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale. An orthogonally
rotated principal component analysis of the 24 character strengths yielded five strengths factors that
explained 32% of the variance in life satisfaction, with the transcendence strengths factor as the most substantial
predictor. The strongest predictors of positive affect were the transcendence and leadership
strengths factors; the best predictors of negative affect were the transcendence and temperance
strengths factors; and the strongest predictor of affect balance was the transcendence strengths factor.
The five strengths factors explained 46% of the variance in general self-efficacy, with the leadership
strengths factor as the most substantial predictor. Further analysis indicated that general self-efficacy
mediated the relationship between leadership strengths and global life satisfaction. The results suggest
that different strengths factors are relevant for different positive experiences (e.g., life satisfaction,
self-efficacy beliefs). The findings shed light on the contribution of specific character strengths as a meaningful
resource under stressful conditions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2013
Deposited On:16 Apr 2013 08:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:44
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0191-8869
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2013.03.006

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